I Have a Dream – Martin Luther King Jr. (circa 1963)

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In 1963, Martin Luther King delivers his “I Have a Dream Speech” in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.
I have a dream today.
I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.
I have a dream today.[91]

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Celebrate National Milk Day (Jan. 11) with Martha Stewart’s Bananas Foster Milkshake

Thank ol’ Bessie for that big glass of milk you have for breakfast!  It’s National Milk Day.

National Milk Day on January 11 commemorates the day that many think the first milk deliveries in glass bottles began in the United States.  Alexander Campbell of the New York Dairy Company professed to the New York State Senate that his company was the first to make these deliveries in 1878.

In 1915, The International Association of Milk Inspectors submitted a request to Congress in October of 1915 for a resolution naming an observance of National Milk Day. A date was not suggested in their request. No record that the incoming Congress ever presented a resolution for National Milk Day has been found, nor did incoming President Woodrow Wilson ever declare the day.

Regardless, it’s a day to celebrate milk and a good excuse to have a milkshake!

Martha Stewart's Bananas Foster Milkshake

Photo by Bryan Gardner

 

To celebrate, make a Bananas Foster Milkshake from Martha Stewart’s recipes.

This recipe is inspired from the sweet and salty dessert of the same name.

Ingredients:

 

Directions:

  1. Dip rim of a tall glass in caramel. Place glass in freezer while preparing milkshake.
  2. Blend vanilla ice cream and milk until thick but pourable. Add 1/2 of the banana and pulse to combine.
  3. Sprinkle remaining banana slices with sugar; using a hand-held kitchen torch, caramelize the bananas.
  4.  Spread some caramel sauce on the inside of the prepared glass. Add coffee ice cream. Drizzle with more caramel sauce and break 2 pretzels into glass. Top with milkshake; do not fill to the top of the glass or it will overflow when toppings are added. Pipe on whipped cream, as desired. Top with bruleed banana, more caramel sauce, and pretzels also dipped in caramel. Serve with a straw, a bowl and a spoon.

 

 

Milk Trivia

—  The United States and Australia are the world’s largest exporters of milk and milk products.

Life Photographer Nat Farbman's photo of cats Blackie and Brownie getting squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher's Dairy Farm.

Udder Bliss: Cats Blackie and Brownie (in foreground) catching squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher’s dairy farm. Photo by Nat Farbman

—  Throughout the world, there are more than 6 billion consumers of milk and milk products.

—  In the Middle Ages, milk was called the virtuous white liquor because alcoholic beverages were more reliable than water.

—  1863 – French chemist and biologist Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization, a method of killing harmful bacteria in beverages and food products.

—  1884 – American Doctor Hervey Thatcher of New York City, developed the first modern glass milk bottle, called ‘Thatcher’s Common Sense Milk Jar,’ which was sealed with a waxed paper disk. Later, in 1932, plastic-coated paper milk cartons were introduced commercially as a consequence of their invention by Victor W. Farris.

—  The females of all mammal species can by definition produce milk, but cow milk dominates commercial production. In 2011, FAO estimates  85% of all milk worldwide was produced from cows.   

—  Aside from cattle, many kinds of livestock provide milk used by humans for dairy products. These animals include buffalo, goat, sheep, camel, donkey, horse, reindeer and yak.

—  Milk is processed into a variety of dairy products such as cream, butter, yogurt, kefir, ice cream and cheese.

—   Modern industrial processes use milk to produce casein, whey protein, lactose, condensed milk, powdered milk and many other food-additive and industrial products.

—  World Milk Day is celebrated on June 1.

 

The Top 7 Dairy Cow Breeds are:

Holstein Cow

Holstein cows are the most popular of dairy breeds, since they tend to produce more milk than all the others. Holsteins are black and white (and sometimes red). Their markings are like human fingerprints: no Holsteins have the same markings. 

  1. Holsteins
  2. Jerseys
  3. Guernseys
  4. Ayrshires
  5. Brown Swiss
  6. Milking Shorthorns aka Durhams
  7. Dutch Belted

 

Fluffy Dinner Rolls

The not-so-secret ingredient is mashed potatoes.  IF you have any left-overs from the holiday meal but not enough potatoes to go around, this is the best way for everyone to enjoy them.  (Besides… waste not, want not.)

Ingredients: 

1 c. milk
2/3 c. butter or margarine
2/3 c. sugar
1 TBsp. salt
2 cups chilled mashed potatoes
2 pkgs. yeast
1/2 c. lukewarm water
2 eggs
6-8 cups flour

Don’t forget to knead bread and then let rise prior rolling into balls in a lightly greased pan.

Bake: 375° F for 15 to 20 minutes.

Garlic Mashed Red Potatoes

“These creamy garlic mashed potatoes are so good, you can serve them plain—no butter or gravy is needed. This is the only way we prepare mashed potatoes”. —Valerie Mitchell, Olathe, Kansas

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 8 medium red potatoes, quartered
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup fat-free milk, warmed
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions

  1. Place potatoes and garlic in a large saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until potatoes are very tender.
  2. Drain well. Add the butter, milk and salt; mash. Stir in cheese.

Nutritional Facts 

1 cup: 190 calories, 5g fat (3g saturated fat), 14mg cholesterol, 275mg sodium, 36g carbohydrate (0 sugars, 4g fiber), 8g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 2 starch, 1/2 fat.

 

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice/Spiced Nuts Recipes by Taste of Home©

For a delicious spice to add to pumpkin pie, try this spice blend. The blend can also be added to spiced nut blends.—Mary Dixon, Catlin, Illinois

Makes 30 Servings

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: Approximately  2-1/2 tablespoons.

Ingredients:

  • 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

 

 

 

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place up to 6 months.
  2. Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice may be used as a substitute for store-bought pumpkin pie spice or to prepare the following recipe: Spiced Nuts.

 

Originally published as Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice in Country Woman November/December 1995

 

 

Spiced Nuts

Yield: 6 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 egg white
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • 2 cans (12 ounces each) salted mixed nuts
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Homemade Pumpkin Spice (recipe above)

 

Directions: 

  1. In a small bowl, beat egg white until frothy. Add water; beat until soft peaks form. Stir in nuts; toss to coat. Combine sugar and spice; stir into nut mixture. Spread nuts evenly on a greased 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pan.
  2. Bake at 325° for 25-30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cool on waxed paper.

 
Originally published as Spiced Nuts in Country Woman November/December 1995, p21