10 Things You Didn’t Know About Albert Einstein

Most people know that Albert Einstein was a famous scientist who came up with the formula E=mc2. But do you know these ten things about this genius?

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was born March 14,1879.

10. Loved to Sail
When Einstein attended college at the Polytechnic Institute in Zurich, Switzerland, he fell in love with sailing. He would often take a boat out onto a lake, pull out a notebook, relax, and think. Even though Einstein never learned to swim, he kept sailing as a hobby throughout his life.

9. Einstein’s Brain
When Einstein died in 1955, his body was cremated and his ashes scattered, as was his wish. However, before his body was cremated, pathologist Thomas Harvey at Princeton Hospital conducted an autopsy in which he removed Einstein’s brain. Rather than putting the brain back in the body, Harvey decided to keep it, ostensibly for study. Harvey did not have permission to keep Einstein’s brain, but days later, he convinced Einstein’s son that it would help science. Shortly thereafter, Harvey was fired from his position at Princeton because he refused to give up Einstein’s brain.

For the next four decades, Harvey kept Einstein’s chopped-up brain (Harvey had it cut into over 200 pieces) in two mason jars with him as he moved around the country. Every once in a while, Harvey would slice off a piece and send it to a researcher. Finally, in 1998, Harvey returned Einstein’s brain to the pathologist at Princeton Hospital.

8. Einstein and the Violin
Einstein’s mother, Pauline, was an accomplished pianist and wanted her son to love music too, so she started him on violin lessons when he was six years old. Unfortunately, at first, Einstein hated playing the violin. He would much rather build houses of cards, which he was really good at (he once built one 14 stories high!), or do just about anything else. When Einstein was 13-years old, he suddenly changed his mind about the violin when he heard the music of Mozart. With a new passion for playing, Einstein continued to play the violin until the last few years of his life. For nearly seven decades, Einstein would not only use the violin to relax when he became stuck in his thinking process, he would play socially at local recitals or join in impromptu groups such as Christmas carolers who stopped at his home.

7. Presidency of Israel
A few days after Zionist leader and first President of Israel Chaim Weizmann died on November 9, 1952, Einstein was asked if he would accept the position of being the second president of Israel. Einstein, age 73, declined the offer. In his official letter of refusal, Einstein stated that he not only lacked the “natural aptitude and the experience to deal properly with people,” but also, he was getting old.

Albert Einstein sticking his tongue out

Check out this website dedicated to Al: http://einstein.biz

6. No Socks
Part of Einstein’s charm was his disheveled look. In addition to his uncombed hair, one of Einstein’s peculiar habits was to never wear socks. Whether it was while out sailing or to a formal dinner at the White House, Einstein went without socks everywhere. To Einstein, socks were a pain because they often would get holes in them. Plus, why wear both socks and shoes when one of them would do just fine?

5. A Simple Compass
When Albert Einstein was five years old and sick in bed, his father showed him a simple pocket compass. Einstein was mesmerized. What force exerted itself on the little needle to make it point in a single direction? This question haunted Einstein for many years and has been noted as the beginning of his fascination with science.

4. Designed a Refrigerator
Twenty-one years after writing his Special Theory of Relativity, Albert Einstein invented a refrigerator that operated on alcohol gas. The refrigerator was patented in 1926 but never went into production because new technology made it unnecessary. Einstein invented the refrigerator because he read about a family that was poisoned by a sulphur dioxide-emitting refrigerator.

3. Obsessed Smoker
Einstein loved to smoke. As he walked between his house and his office at Princeton, one could often see him followed by a trail of smoke. Nearly as part of his image as his wild hair and baggy clothes was Einstein clutching his trusty briar pipe. In 1950, Einstein is noted as saying, “I believe that pipe smoking contributes to a somewhat calm and objective judgment in all human affairs,” Although he favored pipes, Einstein was not one to turn down a cigar or even a cigarette.

2. Married His Cousin
After Einstein divorced his first wife, Mileva Maric, in 1919, he married his cousin, Elsa Loewenthal (nee Einstein). How closely were they related? Quite close. Elsa was actually related to Albert on both sides of his family. Albert’s mother and Elsa’s mother were sisters, plus Albert’s father and Elsa’s father were cousins. When they were both little, Elsa and Albert had played together; however, their romance only began once Elsa had married and divorced Max Loewenthal.

1. An Illegitimate Daughter
In 1901, before Albert Einstein and Mileva Maric were married, the college sweethearts took a romantic getaway to Lake Como in Italy. After the vacation, Mileva found herself pregnant. In that day and age, illegitimate children were not uncommon and yet they were also not accepted by society. Since Einstein did not have the money to marry Maric nor the ability to support a child, the two were not able to get married until Einstein got the patent job over a year later. So as not to besmirch Einstein’s reputation, Maric went back to her family and had the baby girl, whom she named Lieserl.

Although we know that Einstein knew about his daughter, we don’t actually know what happened to her. There are but just a few references of her in Einstein’s letters, with the last one in September 1903. It is believed that Lieserl either died after suffering from scarlet fever at an early age or she survived the scarlet fever and was given up for adoption. Both Albert and Mileva kept the existence of Lieserl so secret that Einstein scholars only discovered her existence in recent years.

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Happy Pi Day!

Happy Pi Day!

Yes, it is Albert Einstein’s birthday, March 14, 1879. Could it also be coincidence that it is also the same date as Pi? 3.143.14159265359 Hmmmmm….

Today is March 14th, or 3/14. And that makes it Pi Day.

Andrea Peterson of the Washington Post explains, “Here’s a quick refresher course: Pi is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Most of us learned the abbreviated 3.14 number in grade school, but pi can be calculated out infinitely without a discernable repeating pattern. It is both irrational and transcendental.”

Basil Beer Bread

Yield: 1 Loaf
Calories: 336

Basil Beer Bread

Get the Basil Beer Bread recipe on the Real Simple website.

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil for the baking sheet
  • 3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4-ounce package active dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces) grated Parmesan
  • 1 12-ounce bottle beer, preferably ale
  • flour for the work surface
  • 1 cup chopped or torn fresh basil

Directions:
1. Heat oven to 400° F. Oil a baking sheet. In the bowl of a standing mixer on low, or in a large bowl using a spoon, combine the flour, yeast, salt, pepper, and Parmesan.

2. Add the beer and mix just until the dough comes together. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle with the basil and knead gently just until incorporated. Shape the dough into a round loaf and transfer to the prepared sheet.

3. Bake until the loaf is lightly browned and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 40 to 45 minutes. Turn the loaf onto a wire rack. Let cool for at least 10 minutes before slicing.

Tip: You can also toast this dense, hearty bread and drizzle it with olive oil.

Nutritional Information:
Calories From Fat 8%; Fat 3g; Sat Fat 2g; Cholesterol 3mg; Sodium 977mg; Carbohydrate 63g; Fiber 3g; Sugar 0g; Protein 12g

Lemon Meat Balls

Girl Scouts of America Image

On March 12,1912, Juliette Gordon Low officially registered the organization’s first 18 girl members in Savannah, Georgia. It is celebrated as Girl Scout birthday.

This recipe can be found in the Cadette Handbook of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, copyright 1963.  

Ingredients:

  •  1 1/2 lbs. ground beef
  • 1 egg slightly beaten
  • 1 tsp. grated lemon rind
  • 3 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp. pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. thyme
  • 1/4 tsp. marjoram
  • 3 Tbsp. finely chopped onion
  • 1/3 c. uncooked rice
  • 1 can (10 1/2 oz.) tomato soup
  • 2 c. boiling water

Directions:  Mix all but last two ingredients. Shape mixture into balls about 1 1/2 inches in diameter. The mixture will be soft, but makes   tender meat balls. Brown a few at a time in a little hot fat and remove from skillet. When all are browned, pour excess fat from skillet and return meat balls to pan. Cover with tomato soup-boiling water mixture. Cover pan. Simmer 50 to 60 minutes. Remove meat balls.  Spoon excess fat from sauce. Pour sauce over meat balls and serve. (4-6 servings)

Girl Scouts Birthday

Girl Scout of the United States of America logo

The Girl Scout Promise

On my honor I will try:
To Serve God, My country and mankind,  And to live by the Girl Scout Law

The Girl Scout Law

I will do my Best: 

  • to be honest
  • to be fair
  • to help where I am needed
  • to be cheerful
  • to be friendly and considerate
  • to be a sister to every Girl Scout
  • to respect authority
  • to use resources wisely
  • to protect and improve the world around me
  • to show respect for myself and others through my words and actions

For more information on Scouting, click Here.