Orange Chipotle-Spiced Pecan Mix

Recipe from Cooking Light/Laura Zapalowski, November 2008
 
Orange Chipotle-Spiced Pecan Mix
Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner; Styling: Cindy Barr, Jan Gautro, Leigh Ann Ross

Yield: 2-1/2 cups (Servings size: 2 Tablespoons)

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon grated orange rind
  • 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
  • 1 large egg white
  • 2 cups pecan halves
  • 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground chipotle chile pepper
  • Cooking spray
  • 1/2 cup sweetened dried cranberries

Directions: 

  1. Preheat oven to 225°.
  2. Combine first 3 ingredients in a medium bowl; stir with a whisk. Stir in pecans. Combine sugar, salt, and pepper. Add to pecan mixture; toss well. Spread mixture in a single layer on a jelly-roll pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 225° for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Remove from oven; cool completely. Stir in cranberries.

Note: Store in an airtight container for up to one week.

Witches’ Brew Ice Cream Soda

witches brew ice cream soda
Photo by Hershey’s Kitchens.®

Yield: Makes two 8-oz. servings.

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons HERSHEY’S Syrup
  • 16 fluid-ounces Cold club soda, seltzer or ginger ale
  • 4 scoops (about 1 cup) orange sherbet
  • TWIZZLERS Strawberry Twists(optional)

Directions:

1. Combine syrup with small amount of club soda in 16-ounce soda glass.
2. Add sherbet; fill glass with club soda. Garnish with candy. Serve immediately.

 

“The Spider and The Fly” Poem and Maze

The Spider and the Fly as illustrated by Tony DiTerlizzi
by Mary Howitt (Author), Tony DiTerlizzi (Author, Illustrator)

The Spider and The Fly

by Mary Howitt (1799-1888)

“Will you walk into my parlor?” said the spider to the fly;
“‘Tis the prettiest little parlor that ever you may spy.
The way into my parlor is up a winding stair,
And I have many curious things to show when you are there.”
“Oh no, no,” said the little fly; “to ask me is in vain,
For who goes up your winding stair can ne’er come down again.”

“I’m sure you must be weary, dear, with soaring up so high.
Well you rest upon my little bed?” said the spider to the fly.
“There are pretty curtains drawn around; the sheets are fine and thin,
And if you like to rest a while, I’ll snugly tuck you in!”
“Oh no, no,” said the little fly, “for I’ve often heard it said,
They never, never wake again who sleep upon your bed!”

Said the cunning spider to the fly: “Dear friend, what can I do
To prove the warm affection I’ve always felt for you?
I have within my pantry good store of all that’s nice;
I’m sure you’re very welcome – will you please to take a slice?”
“Oh no, no,” said the little fly; “kind sir, that cannot be:
I’ve heard what’s in your pantry, and I do not wish to see!”

“Sweet creature!” said the spider, “you’re witty and you’re wise;
How handsome are your gauzy wings; how brilliant are your eyes!
I have a little looking-glass upon my parlor shelf;
If you’d step in one moment, dear, you shall behold yourself.”
“I thank you, gentle sir,” she said, “for what you’re pleased to say,
And, bidding you good morning now, I’ll call another day.”

The spider turned him round about, and went into his den,
For well he knew the silly fly would soon come back again:
So he wove a subtle web in a little corner sly,
And set his table ready to dine upon the fly;
Then came out to his door again and merrily did sing:
“Come hither, hither, pretty fly, with pearl and silver wing;
Your robes are green and purple; there’s a crest upon your head;
Your eyes are like diamond bright, but mine are dull as lead!”

Alas, alas! how very soon this silly little fly,
Hearing his wily, flattering words, came slowly flitting by;
With buzzing wings she hung aloft, then near and nearer grew,
Thinking only of her brilliant eyes and green and purple hue,
Thinking only of her crested head. Poor, foolish thing! at last
Up jumped the cunning spider, and fiercely held her fast;
He dragged her up his winding stair, into the dismal den –
Within his little parlor – but she ne’er came out again!

And now, dear little children, who may this story read,
To idle, silly flattering words I pray you ne’er give heed;
Unto an evil counselor close heart and ear and eye,
And take a lesson from this tale of the spider and the fly.

 

spider maze

Can you get the spider to the fly?

Pumpkin Fudge

Pumpkin Fudge
Photo by Better Homes and Gardens©

Yield: 96 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup butter
  • One 5-ounce can evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup canned pumpkin
  • One 10-ounce package cinnamon-flavored pieces
  • One 7-ounce jar marshmallow creme
  • 3/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted

Directions:

  1. Line a 13x9x2-inch baking pan with foil, extending foil over edges of pan. Butter foil; set pan aside.
  2. In a 3-quart heavy saucepan combine sugar, butter, evaporated milk, and pumpkin. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until mixture boils. Clip a candy thermometer to side of pan. Reduce heat to medium-low; continue boiling at a moderate, steady rate, stirring frequently, until thermometer registers 234 degrees F, soft-ball stage (20 to 25 minutes). (Adjust heat as necessary to maintain a steady boil.)
  3. Remove saucepan from heat; remove thermometer from saucepan. Stir in cinnamon-flavored pieces until melted. Stir in marshmallow creme and walnuts.
  4. Immediately spread fudge evenly in prepared pan. Score into squares while warm. Let fudge cool to room temperature. When fudge is firm, use foil to lift it out of pan. Cut into squares. Cover tightly and chill for up to 1 week. Do not freeze.
Nutrition Facts (Pumpkin Fudge)
Per serving: 68 kcal cal., 3 g fat (2 g sat. fat, 1 g polyunsaturated fat, 1 g monounsatured fat), 4 mg chol., 14 mg sodium, 10 g carb., 9 g sugar
Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet