A Salute to the “King of the Cowboys” – the Roy Rogers Beverage

Roy Rogers, Dale Evans and Trigger

Queen of the West Dale Evans poses alongside her husband Roy Rogers and his horse Trigger.

Known as ‘King of the Cowboys,’ Roy Rogers is one of the most recognized cowboys in the world and often appeared with cowgirl Dale Evans. His majestic singing voice, charm and good guy persona was portrayed in all of his movies and TV shows including Tumbling TumbleweedsThe Cowboy and the Señorita and The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show.

Actor and singer Leonard Franklin Slye was born on November 5, 1911, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to parents Andrew and Mattie Slye. Known best as a singing cowboy, Rogers, with his trademark horse Trigger, appeared in nearly 100 films during the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s, many of them featuring his third wife, Dale Evans.  He died July 6, 1998.

Like child actress Shirley Temple, a non-alcoholic drink was named after American icon Roy Rogers.  The recipe is below.

The Roy Rogers

The Roy Rogers beverage

Photo Source: Allrecipes.com

This is also sometimes called a Cherry Cola despite the fact that most grenadine is made of pomegranate, not cherries. Whatever you call it, it is a nice mocktail.

Ingredients: 

Directions:  Pour the ingredients into a collins glass filled with ice. Stir well.  Garnish with the maraschino cherry.

(recipe provided by )

Guy Fawkes Day

On 5 November 1605 Londoners were encouraged to celebrate the King’s escape from assassination by lighting bonfires, “always provided that ‘this testemonye of joy be carefull done without any danger or disorder'”. An Act of Parliament designated each 5 November as a day of thanksgiving for “the joyful day of deliverance”, and remained in force until 1859. Although he was only one of 13 conspirators, Fawkes is today the individual most associated with the failed Plot.

Guy Fawkes mask

The Guy Fawkes mask is a stylised depiction of Guy Fawkes, the best-known member of the Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up the House of Lords in London in 1605. The use of a mask on an effigy has long roots as part of Guy Fawkes Night celebrations.

In Britain, 5 November has variously been called Guy Fawkes Night, Guy Fawkes Day, Plot Night  and Bonfire Night; the latter can be traced directly back to the original celebration of 5 November 1605.  Bonfires were accompanied by fireworks from the 1650s onwards, and it became the custom to burn an effigy (usually the pope) after 1673, when the heir presumptive, James, Duke of York, made his conversion to Catholicism public. Effigies of other notable figures who have become targets for the public’s ire, such as Paul Kruger and Margaret Thatcher, have also found their way onto the bonfires, although most modern effigies are of Fawkes. The “guy” is normally created by children, from old clothes, newspapers, and a mask. During the 19th century, “guy” came to mean an oddly dressed person, but in American English it lost any pejorative connotation, and was used to refer to any male person.

William Harrison Ainsworth’s 1841 historical romance Guy Fawkes; or, The Gunpowder Treason portrays Fawkes in a generally sympathetic light, and transformed him in the public perception into an “acceptable fictional character”. Fawkes subsequently appeared as “essentially an action hero” in children’s books and penny dreadfuls such as The Boyhood Days of Guy Fawkes; or, The Conspirators of Old London, published in about 1905. Historian Lewis Call has observed that Fawkes is now “a major icon in modern political culture”. He went on to write that the image of Fawkes’s face became “a potentially powerful instrument for the articulation of postmodern anarchism”[h] during the late 20th century, exemplified by the mask worn by V in the comic book series V for Vendetta, who fights against a fictional fascist English state.

Guy Fawkes is sometimes toasted as “the last man to enter Parliament with honest intentions.”

Source: Wikipedia