Bessie Coleman Remembered

Bessie Coleman, born in 1892, was an American daredevil aviator who died on April 30, 1926.

She was the world’s first black female aviator to obtain a pilot’s license (1921). Her father was of mostly Cherokee descent, making her also the first female of native American descent to earn a pilot’s license. U.S. pilot schools were unwilling to take a black female student, so she learned French and went to Paris to earn her license.

She died in a plane crash while preparing for a show. While flying as a passenger with a student pilot, the plane suffered a mechanical failure and spun out of control. Not seat belted in, she fell out of the plane and plummeted to her death. The pilot died in the crash.

African American Aviator Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman, who died April 30, 1926, had a true adventurous spirit. 

 

For more trivia, click on Today’s Trivia to learn more.

Crockpot Italian Pork Roast

Recipe by /The Family Freezer©

Ingredients:

  • 2-pound boneless pork roast
  • 28oz can diced tomatoes, undrained (You can sub 6 medium-sized tomatoes, cored, seeds and juiced removed, and chopped – about 3 cups)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon parsley
  • 1 teaspoon basil
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, optional  (Add salt if using fresh tomatoes and want to bring out the flavor)

 

 

 

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in crockpot and cook on “low” setting for 6 hours in a 6-quart crockpot or 8-10 hours in a 4-quart crockpot.

 

To Freeze and Cook Later –

Label a gallon-sized freezer bag with the name of the recipe, cooking instructions, and “use-by” date (which should be three months from when you prepped the meal).  Add all ingredients to freezer bag, seal, and freeze.  When ready to eat, thaw overnight in refrigerator or in water.  Cook on low setting for 6 hours in a 6-quart crockpot or 8-10 hours in a 4-quart crockpot.

Crockpot Italian Pork Roast

Photo by A. Jones

Serve over spaghetti with a side of broccoli or green beans.

 

Martha Stewart’s Open-Face Tuna Melt

Yield: 2 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 (5-ounce) tin tuna, drained
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Provolone cheese slices
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 slices sandwich bread, lightly toasted
  • Dill pickle slices
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated Parmesan

 

Directions:

  1. Evenly divide tuna between bread; season with salt and pepper. Top with a few slices of dill pickle and a slice or two of provolone.
  2. Stir together mayonnaise, Dijon, and Parmesan. Spread evenly over sandwiches. Broil until cheese melts and mayo puffs slightly and browns in places, 1 to 2 minutes.

 

 

 

Source: Martha Stewart Living, July/August 2017

Slow-Cooked Coffee Pot Roast Recipe

Recipe by Taste of Home.com©

 

Yield: 12 Servings

 

Ingredients: 

  • 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 boneless beef chuck roast (3-1/2 to 4 pounds), quartered
  • 1 cup brewed coffee
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 6 tablespoons cold water

 

Directions:

  1. Place half of the onions in a 5-qt. slow cooker. Top with garlic and half of the beef. Top with remaining onion and beef. Combine coffee and soy sauce; pour over beef. Cover and cook on low until meat is tender, 9-10 hours.
  2. Combine cornstarch and water until smooth; stir into cooking juices. Cover and cook on high until gravy is thickened, 30 minutes.

 

 

 

Nutrition Facts

4 ounces cooked beef: 248 calories, 13g fat (5g saturated fat), 86mg cholesterol, 362mg sodium, 5g carbohydrate (2g sugars, 1g fiber), 27g protein.

Originally published as Slow-Cooked Coffee Pot Roast in Country Woman November/December 2001

Celebrate Trees on Earth Day (April 22)

TREES

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.

 

written February 2, 1913 by Alfred Joyce Kilmer 

 

 

Decorate Your Yard with an Ornamental Tree

by George and Becky Lohmiller

If you are looking for an attractive ornamental tree for your yard, there are the old standbys like crabapple, flowering cherry, hawthorn, or Japanese maple. While any one of these trees will add interest for part of the season, there are less common ones that have four-season value and are sure to have your friends asking, “Wow, what kind of tree is that?”

The Katsura Tree
(Cercidiphyllum japonicum)
Pyramidal when young, the 40 to 60–foot–tall tree assumes a graceful, rounded shape with maturity. The spring leaves start out in a rosy purple color and change to blue–green. In autumn, the 2 to 4–inch–long, heart–shaped foliage develops shades of yellow, orange, and apricot. As the leaves drop, they scent the air with a sweet, spicy fragrance with hints of cinnamon or caramel. Its lightly–peeling, shaggy brown bark carries katsura’s charm right through the winter.

The Persian Parrotia
(Parrotia persica)
This spectacular performer is sure to turn heads any time of the year. It grows a modest 20 to 40 feet tall with a 15 to 30–foot spread. In March or early April, a haze of small crimson flowers covers the tree, followed by developing reddish–purple leaves that mature to a deep green. It is parrotia’s brilliant autumn foliage, however, that really steals the show, with a breathtaking display of bright yellow, orange, and scarlet leaves. Exfoliating bark that reveals shades of creamy white, green, gray, and brown tones give this tree exceptional winter interest.

Japanese Stewartia
(Stewartia pseudocamellia)
Another small tree (20 to 40 feet tall), the Stewartia will brighten up any landscape. Its 2 to 3–inch–wide, white flowers with orange anthers resemble camellia blossoms and open in July. Young leaves start with a purple tint but later turn dark green. Stewartia’s stunning fall foliage is orange, red, or both. Its showy bark unfolds in layers, displaying a mosaic of grays, reds, and oranges that won’t go unnoticed in any season.

These three offbeat ornamentals are hardy to Zone 4 and are seldom bothered by insects or diseases. It is probably by coincidence that all of these trees end in the letter “a,” but we think that for the outstanding job they perform in the landscape, this should probably be changed to an “A+.”

To find your area’s Plant Hardiness Zone, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, click here.

 

 

Peter Cottontail’s Easter Bunny Story

Danny Kaye, Casey Kasem and Vincent Price voice the characters who live in April Valley  in the Jules Bass/Arthur Rankin Jr. produced “Here Comes Peter Cottontail.”

 

Deviled Eggs with Old Bay Shrimp

Yield: 24
Ingredients:
  • 24 rock or bay shrimp
  • 1 c. white wine vinegar
  • 12 hard-boiled eggs
  • 1/2 c. mayonnaise
  • 2 tbsp. dill pickle juice
  • 1 tsp. Old Bay seasoning
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • pinch Old Bay seasoning
  • 24 sprig fresh dill

 

Directions: 
  1. In a large bowl, combine 24 cooked and peeled rock or bay shrimp and 1 cup of white wine vinegar; refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in a food processor, blend the yolks from 12 hard-boiled eggs (halved whites reserved), 1/2 cup of mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons of dill pickle juice, 1 teaspoon of Old Bay seasoning, and 1/2 teaspoon of salt until smooth.
  2. Drain the shrimp and set them aside. Distribute the filling among the reserved egg-white halves and sprinkle each with a pinch of Old Bay seasoning. Top each deviled egg with a pickled shrimp and a sprig of fresh dill. Serve immediately.

Apricot Glazed Green Beans recipe

  • kosher salt
  • Pepper
  • 2 lb. green beans
  • 6 slice bacon
  • 1/4 c. olive oil
  • 4 clove garlic
  • 1/4 c. apricot jam
  • 3 tbsp. white wine vinegar

 

Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon salt, then the green beans, and cook until just tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat until crisp, 6 to 8 minutes; transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Let cool, then break into pieces.
  3. Wipe out the skillet and heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the garlic begins to brown, about 2 minutes.
  4. Stir in the jam, vinegar, and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Add the green beans and toss to coat. Fold in the bacon.

 

 

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