National Taffy Day – May 23rd!

Here are today’s five food facts about Taffy: Salt water taffy was “invented” in Atlantic City in 1883. Modern technology allows confectioners to produce 1,000 pieces of taffy a minute. In one hour enough pieces of taffy are made to cover one third of the length of Atlantic City (about […]

via May 23rd is National Taffy Day! — Foodimentary – National Food Holidays

National Barbecue Day – May 16, 2017

5 Fun Facts about BBQ from Foodimentary.com

LBJ and Hubery H. Humphrey, Victory Barbecue, 11/4/1964, by Hulton Archive, with permission of Getty Images.

President Lyndon Johnson and Humbert H. Humphrey celebrate the election results at the Victory Barbecue November 4 in 1964. Photo by Getty Images©

  • Grilling is no longer considered a male dominated activity. While 51 percent of males cha-cha with the charcoal, 49 percent of women flamenco with the flames.
  • 263,000 moist towelettes will wipe up BBQ sauce covering fingers and faces.
  • The most common ingredient added to barbecue sauce is garlic, followed by brown sugar.
  • The original barbecue sauce, dating back hundreds of years, consisted of vinegar and pepper.
  • Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th president of the United States, hosted the first barbecue at the White House that featured Texas-style barbecued ribs.

LYNDON JOHNSON’S FAVORITE BARBEQUE SAUCE

  • 1/4 c. butter or margarine
  • 1/4 c. cider vinegar
  • 1/4 c. ketchup
  • 1/4 c. lemon juice
  • 1/4 c. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 t. Tabasco sauce

 

Directions:

  1. Bring all ingredients to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. If baking chicken, pour over the chicken pieces in a foil lined pan.
  3. Bake, uncovered at 350° for 1 hour, basting occasionally. This is enough sauce to cover 6 large pieces of chicken. If baking more, this recipe can be doubled or tripled.
  4. Refrigerate leftover sauce.

 

Find Walter “The Barbecue King” Jetton’s recipe here.  He was instrumental in making LBJ’s barbecue events successful.

National Chocolate Chip Day – May 15th

National Chocolate Chip Day celebrates and enjoys sweet, tasty chocolate chips. Chocolate chips are a great invention, and certainly deserve a little recognition. After all, where would chocolate chip cookies, cakes and muffins be without the chocolate chip!?

NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® chocolate chip cookie

Everyone loves NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® chocolate chip cookies!

Chocolate chips are popular in cooking and baking, for a wide variety of breads, cakes, and cookies. There is an almost endless number of recipes. They are also used in decorating. Have you ever had chocolate chip pancakes? How about chocolate chips in trail mix? If you’ve never had these, then you’re leading a sheltered life.

Rare is the leftover chocolate chip. If you don’t use the whole bag, you and/or your kids will likely eat them as a snack before they make it to the storage container.

 

Original NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

Ruth Graves Wakefield of Massachusetts, invented the chocolate chip cookie in 1938. This is the original recipe she made. The name of the cookie was altered a bit over the years, and is now formally called “Nestle’s Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie”. Other than the name, the recipe is the same as it was in 1938, when Ruth first made it.

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup(2 sticks) butter, softened
  • 3/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cups packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups Nestle Toll House Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels
  • 1 cup chopped nuts

Note: If you substitute margarine for butter, you are not re-creating the original recipe.

Directions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 °.
  2. In a bowl, combine flour, baking soda and salt. Set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, beat together butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar and vanilla extract until creamy.
  4. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Gradually mix in flour mixture. Stir in morsels and nuts.
  5. Drop by rounded tablespoon onto ungreased baking sheets.
  6. Bake in oven for 9 to 11 minutes, or until a golden brown.
  7. Remove from oven and cool on the baking sheet for 2 minutes.
  8. Remove cookies from baking sheet, and place on wire racks until completely cooled.

National Orange Juice Day – May 4

orange juice and orangesIt may come as no surprise that orange juice is the official beverage of Florida, USA.  Florida, the Sunshine State, is one of the top 3 orange juice producers in the world.  As of the year 2000, the other two being Mexico and Brazil.

About 90% of the Florida orange crop is used to make orange juice.

The process for making frozen concentrated orange juice was developed at the Florida Department of Citrus in 1945.  The Department gave the patent to the U.S. Government in hopes to advance the frozen food industry through the country.

According to Food Reference.com, here is some Orange Trivia:orange

  • There are 3,236  people in the U.S. listed on whitepages.com with the last name ‘Orange’ (Mark Morton, ‘Gastronomica’, Fall 2010)
  • The official state Flower of Florida is the Orange Blossom (1909) and the official state Fruit is the Orange (2005).
  • Florida produces about 70% of the total U.S. crop, and 90% of its production goes to make juice.  CDC.gov – 5 a Day
  • The orange is technically a hesperidum, a type of berry.
  • The orange was the first fresh fruit to bear a trademark. In 1919 the California Fruit Growers Exchange burned ‘Sunkist’ on their oranges.
  • In Queen Victoria’s day, oranges were given as Christmas gifts in England.
  • Almost 40% of the orange crop in the U.S. goes to make frozen concentrate.
  • Brazil produces more oranges than any other country.
  • A popular demonstration at the 1922 Los Angeles County Fair was how to make toothpaste from orange by-products.
  • Oranges were introduced to Hawaii in 1792.
  • The most valuable fruit crops in the United States are in order, grapes, apples, oranges and strawberries (2000).

 

Here’s more trivia from Science Kids:

  • The orange is a citrus fruit and is a hybrid of the pomelo and mandarin.

  • Oranges have been grown since ancient times and originated in Southeast Asia.

  • As of 2010, Brazil grows one third of all the world’s oranges.

  • California and Florida are large producers of oranges in the US.

  • Around 85% of all oranges produced are used for juice.

  • Marmalade is orange jam.

    Marmalade

  • Oranges have a high amount of vitamin C.

  • Oranges are domesticated so you are unlikely to find them growing naturally in the wild.

  • Because oranges do not spoil easily and are full of vitamin C during the years of world exploration sailors planted orange and other citrus trees along trade routes to prevent scurvy which is a disease that develops from a deficiency of vitamin C.

  • It is believed that Christopher Columbus was the first to bring orange seeds to America during his second voyage to the region in 1493.

  • There are now over 600 varieties of oranges worldwide.

  • There are typically ten segments inside an orange.

  • Ideal conditions for growing oranges are in sub-tropical areas that have good amounts of sunshine yet moderate to warm temperatures (15.5°C – 29°C (60°F – 84 °F).

  • Orange peel can be used by gardeners to sprinkle over vegetables as a slug repellent.

  • The white orange blossom, is the state flower of Florida. It is highly fragrant and has long been used in weddings as cake decoration, in bridal bouquets and in head wreaths. The blossom essence is an important component in the making of perfume and the petals can also be made into “orange blossom/flower water”.