Martha Stewart’s Turmeric and Lemon “Tea”

Here’s a little recipe from Martha Stewart that should soothe the throat and relax the nerves.  A cup of tea helps any situation, right?

Homemade Turmeric and Lemon Tea

Recipe photo courtesy of Aaron Dyer

Yield: 1 Quart

Ingredients:

  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • Peel (without pith) of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Pinch of cayenne

 

Directions: 

  1. Bring the ingredients to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. Remove from heat; steep, covered, until the liquid cools to room temperature.
  3. Strain and reheat to serve.

 

The brews can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.

 

 

Grandma K’s Turkey Gravy Recipe

Here’s a stress-free recipe that’ll impress Grandma herself! Seasonings and a shallot add wonderful flavor` to this velvety gravy, which tastes just as good the next day. —Jesse Klausmeier, Burbank, California

 

Grandma K's Turkey Gravy

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: 2 cups (approx. 16 servings)

Ingredients:

  • Reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

 

Directions: 

  1. Pour drippings into a 2-cup measuring cup. Skim fat, reserving 1/4 cup. Add enough broth to the drippings to measure 2 cups.
  2. Saute shallot in reserved fat in a small saucepan. Stir in the flour, salt, onion powder, poultry seasoning and pepper until blended; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until browned (do not burn). Gradually add broth. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened.

 

Originally published as Grandma’s Turkey Gravy in Simple & Delicious October/November 2012, p46

Southern Corn Bread Dressing Recipe

Southern Corn Bread Dressing

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: 10 Servings

Ingredients: 

  • 8 cups coarsely crumbled corn bread
  • 4 hard-boiled large eggs, chopped
  • 1 medium green pepper, finely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 2 celery ribs, finely chopped
  • Turkey giblets, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons poultry seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3 cups chicken broth

 

Directions: 

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. In a large bowl, combine first 10 ingredients. In another bowl, whisk eggs and broth. Add to bread mixture; stir until moistened.
  2. Transfer to a greased 13×9-in. baking dish. Bake, uncovered, 40-45 minutes or until lightly browned and a thermometer inserted in the center reads 160°.

 

Originally published as Southern Corn Bread Dressing in Simple & Delicious October/November 2010, p51

Cranberry Brie Appetizer — Your Homebased Mom

Appetizers are my favorite part of a meal and this Cranberry Brie is at the top of the list. It’s the perfect holiday appetizer for any parties on your calendar or your own holiday meals. Many times appetizers are an overlooked part of a meal but I love to fix a couple of really good…

via Cranberry Brie Appetizer — Your Homebased Mom

Mashed Cauliflower au Gratin Recipe

Yield: 12 Servings  (3/4 cup each)

Mashed Cauliflower au Gratin

Photo by Taste of Home©

Ingredients:

  • 2 large heads cauliflower, broken into florets
  • 1-1/2 cups shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup shredded Colby-Monterey Jack cheese
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cubed
  • 3/4 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Montreal steak seasoning

TOPPING:

  • 1 cup (4 ounces) Italian-style panko (Japanese) bread crumbs
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Place cauliflower in a stockpot; add water to cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, 10-12 minutes or until very tender. Drain; transfer to a large bowl. Mash cauliflower; stir in cheeses, cubed butter and seasonings. Transfer to a greased 3-qt. or 13×9-in. baking dish.
  2. In a small bowl, mix bread crumbs and melted butter until evenly coated; sprinkle over cauliflower mixture. Bake, uncovered, 40-50 minutes or until heated through and topping is golden brown.

 

Freeze option: Cool unbaked casserole; cover and freeze. To use, partially thaw in refrigerator overnight. Remove from refrigerator 30 minutes before baking. Preheat oven to 350°. Bake casserole as directed, increasing time as necessary to heat through and for a thermometer inserted in center to read 165°.

Nutritional Facts
3/4 cup equals 238 calories, 17 g fat (10 g saturated fat), 41 mg cholesterol, 612 mg sodium, 14 g carbohydrate, 4 g fiber, 9 g protein.

 

Originally published as Mashed Cauliflower Au Gratin in Taste of Home October/November 2012, p79

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

Here’s The Simpsons’ version with a little help from James Earl JonesClick Here to Watch or read the original shown below.

 

By Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

"The Raven" depicts a mysterious raven's midnight visit to a mourning narrator, as illustrated by John Tenniel (1858).

“The Raven” depicts a mysterious raven’s midnight visit to a mourning narrator, as illustrated by John Tenniel (1858).(1809–1849)\

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
Only this and nothing more.”

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
“’Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—
Some late visiter entreating entrance at my chamber door;—
This it is and nothing more.”

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;—
Darkness there and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—
Merely this and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
“Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
’Tis the wind and nothing more!”

raven on a crossOpen here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door—
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as “Nevermore.”

But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”
Then the bird said “Nevermore.”

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
“Doubtless,” said I, “what it utters is its only stock and store
Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore—
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
Of ‘Never—nevermore’.”

But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore
Meant in croaking “Nevermore.”Quote The Raven, "Nevermore"

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom’s core;
This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
On the cushion’s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o’er,
But whose velvet-violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o’er,
She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
“Wretch,” I cried, “thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!—
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted—
On this home by Horror haunted—tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore—
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!” I shrieked, upstarting—
“Get thee back into the tempest and the Night’s Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken!—quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”Edgar Allan Poe and the Raven

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted—nevermore!

 

 

Pumpkin Spice Dip

Recipe by Diabetic Living Magazine

Pumpkin Spice Dip

Photo by Eating Well/Diabetic Living Magazine

 

Yield: 16 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 3 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchatel), softened 
  • ¾ cup canned pumpkin (see Tip below)
  • 1 (6 ounce) container vanilla fat-free yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons packed brown sugar (see Tip)
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 4 apples, sliced
  • 48 honey-wheat braided pretzel twists

 

Directions:

  1. In a medium bowl beat cream cheese with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Beat in pumpkin, yogurt, brown sugar, and pumpkin pie spice. Serve dip with apple slices and honey-wheat braided pretzel twists.

 

 

*Tips:

If you have leftover pumpkin, transfer it to an airtight container or freezer bag. Refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze up to 3 months.

It is not recommended using a sugar substitute for this recipe.