Halloween Candy Bark Recipe

Halloween Candy Bark

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: 44 Servings (2-3/4 pounds)

Ingredients:

  • 2 teaspoons butter
  • 1-1/2 pounds white candy coating, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cups pretzels, coarsely chopped
  • 10 Oreo cookies, chopped
  • 3/4 cup candy corn
  • 3/4 cup dry roasted peanuts
  • 1/2 cup milk chocolate M&M’s
  • 1/2 cup Reese’s Pieces

 

Directions:

  1. Line a 15x10x1-in. baking pan with foil; grease foil with butter. In a microwave, melt candy coating; stir until smooth. Spread into prepared pan. Sprinkle with remaining ingredients; press into candy coating. Let stand about 1 hour.
  2. Break or cut bark into pieces. Store in an airtight container.

 

 

Nutritional Facts
1 ounce: 152 calories, 7g fat (5g saturated fat), 1mg cholesterol, 84mg sodium, 21g carbohydrate (18g sugars, 0 fiber), 1g protein.

 

 

Originally published as Halloween Candy Bark in Taste of Home September/October 2013, p2-8

 

 

Advertisements

Butterfinger® Cookies Recipe

Yield: 48 Servings/4 dozen

Butterfinger Cookies

Photo by Taste of Home©

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2/3 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1-1/4 cups chunky peanut butter
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 5 Butterfinger candy bars (2.1 ounces each), chopped

 

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, cream butter and sugars until light and fluffy. Beat in egg whites. Beat in peanut butter and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture. Stir in candy bars.
  2. Shape into 1-1/2-in. balls and place 2 in. apart on greased baking sheets.
  3. Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Remove to wire racks to cool.

 

Nutritional Facts
1 each: 96 calories, 5g fat (2g saturated fat), 5mg cholesterol, 83mg sodium, 10g carbohydrate (7g sugars, 1g fiber), 2g protein.

 
Originally published as Butterfinger Cookies in Taste of Home June/July 1998, p67

 

Candy Bar Cheesecake Brownies Recipe

Yield: 24 Servings/2 Dozen

Candy Bar Cheesecake Brownies

Photo by Taste of Home©

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup butter, cubed
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/3 cup baking cocoa
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup chopped assorted miniature candy bars (about 18)

 

TOPPING:

  • 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup chopped assorted miniature candy bars (about 10)

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Grease a 13×9-in. baking pan. In a microwave, melt butter in a large microwave-safe bowl. Stir in sugar, cocoa and vanilla. Add eggs, one at a time, whisking to blend after each addition. Add flour and salt; stir just until combined. Stir in 1 cup candy bars.
  2. Spread into prepared pan. In a large bowl, beat cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Beat in vanilla. Add egg; beat on low speed just until blended. Drop by tablespoonfuls over batter. Cut through batter with a knife to swirl. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup candy bars.
  3. Bake 30-35 minutes or until filling in center is almost set. Cool 1 hour in pan on a wire rack. Refrigerate at least 2 hours. Cut into bars.

 

Nutritional Facts
1 brownie: 282 calories, 14g fat (8g saturated fat), 71mg cholesterol, 233mg sodium, 36g carbohydrate (25g sugars, 1g fiber), 4g protein.
Originally published as Candy Bar Cheesecake Brownies in Halloween Bookazine 2015 2015, p92

 

Halloween Trivia

Trick or treating comes from the Middle-Age practice of the poor dressing up in costumes and going around door to door during Hallowmas begging for food or money in exchange for prayers. The food given was often a Soul Cake, which was a small round cake which represented a soul being freed from Purgatory when the cake was eaten.

The tradition of adding pranks into the Halloween mix started to turn ugly in the 1930’s and a movement began to substitute practical jokes for kids going door to door collecting candy.

Happy Halloween

Trick or Treat!

  • Orange and black are Halloween colors because orange is associated with Fall.  The color black is associated with darkness and death.
  • Halloween candy sales average about 2 billion dollars annually in the United States.
  • Chocolate candy bars top the list as the most popular candy for trick-or-treaters with Snickers as Number 1.
  • Candy corn was first made in the 1880s, and it was only more March through November.
  • Over 93% of children will go trick-or-treating. Approximately 84% of trick-or-treaters say candy and gum are their favorites with chocolate candy preferred by 50% and non-chocolate by 24%.
  • Kids’ least favorite items to get in their trick-or-treat bags are fruit and salty snacks like chips and pretzels.
  • Tootsie Rolls were the first wrapped penny candy in America.
  • Candy corn was invented in the 1880s by George Renninger of the Wunderies Candy Company.
    National Candy Corn Day is on October 30th.
  • There are 25 colors of M&Ms, the most popular candy sold in the U.S.
  • It takes an average of 252 licks to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop.
  • San  Francisco is the number one U.S. city for trick-or-treating
  • In 1955, UNICEF (United Nations Children Fund) for Halloween program began.  The original idea started in 1950 in Philadelphia, when a Sunday School class had the idea of collecting money for needy children when trick-or-treating.  They sent the money they made, about $17, to UNICEF which was inspired by the idea and started a trick-or-treat program in 1955.
  • A study from the National Retail Federation shows Americans spent over $300 million on pet costumes last year!

Halloween is also know by other names:

All Hallows Eve
Samhain
All Hallowtide
The Feast of the Dead
The Day of the Dead

  • The tradition of bobbing for apples originated from the Roman harvest festival that honors Pomona, the goddess of fruit trees.
  • Jack o’ Lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed-out turnips to keep away spirits and ghosts on the Samhain holiday.
  • Pumpkins also come in white, blue and green.
  • There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, the color of pumpkin.
  • The ancient Celts thought that spirits and ghosts roamed the countryside on Halloween night. They began wearing masks and costumes to avoid being recognized as human.
  • Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes.
  • Halloween is the 2nd most commercially successful holiday, with Christmas being the first.
  • Halloween also is recognized as the 3rd biggest party day after New Year’s and Super Bowl Sunday.
  • The fear of Halloween is known as Samhainopobia.

Monster Trivia & Folklore

  • Signs of a werewolf are a unibrow, hair palms, tattoos, and a long middle finger.Werewolf in the light of a full moon
  • Vampires are mythical beings who defy death by sucking the blood of humans.
  • In 1962, The Count Dracula Society was founded by Dr. Donald A. Reed.
  • Dracula means “Devil’s son.”  Bram Stoker’s creation “Dracula” was based on the life of Prince Vlad Tepes (1431-1476). He was also called Vlad the Impaler since he had a bad habit of impaling his victims on stakes. The name “Dracula” is Romanian for Devil’s Son.  Vlad Draculas father was a knight of the Order of the Draco (or dragon), so Dracula also translates as “the son of Draco.”
  • To this day, there are vampire clubs and societies with people claiming to be real vampires.
  • There really are so-called vampire bats, but they’re not from Transylvania. They live in Central and South America and feed on the blood of cattle, horses and birds.
  • According to legend, you can kill a vampire by cremate it, pound a stake through its heart or bury it at a crossroads.  Sunlight is also said to kill them. Different countries have different ideas of how to destroy vampires.  Garlic and crosses only keep vampires away.
  • Allegedly, “Revenge falls upon whoever opens the coffin of a mummy.”
  • The country most associated with mummies is Egypt.
  • Zombies often wear chains for they are slaves; slaves of their evil masters who have brought them to life using magic.
  • Two areas of the world particularly associated with the zombie myth are Africa and Haiti, a country on the island of Hispaniola.
  • Many people still believe that gargoyles were created by medieval architects and stone carvers to ward off evil spirits.

Witches

  • The word “witch” comes from the Old English wicce, meaning “wise woman.” In fact, wiccan were highly respected people at one time. According to popular belief, witches held one of their two main meetings, or sabbats, on Halloween night.
  • In the Middle Ages, many people believed that witches avoided detection by turning themselves into cats.
  • Black cats were once believed to be witch’s familiars who protected their powers.

Creepy Tidbits

  • If you see a spider on Halloween, it is the spirit of a loved on watching over you.
  • Worldwide, bats are vital natural enemies of night-flying insects.
  • The common little brown bat of North America has the longest life span for a mammal it’s size, with a life span averaging 32 years.
  • In about 1 in 4 autopsies, a major disease is discovered that was previously undetected.
  • In Medieval times, a spider was rolled in butter and used as a cure for diseases such as leprosy and the plague.
  • The famous magician, Harry Houdini, died on Halloween, 1926 in Detroit, MI.

The next full moon on Halloween night will be October 31, 2020.

haunted house, owl, spider and jack-o-lanterns

Happy Hallowe’en!

The owl is a popular Halloween image. In Medieval Europe, owls were thought to be witches, and to hear an owl’s call meant someone was about to die.

Halloween is Oct. 31 – the last day of the Celtic calendar. It actually was a pagan holiday honoring the dead.

Trick-or-treating evolved from the ancient Celtic tradition of putting out treats and food to placate spirits who roamed the streets at Samhain, a sacred festival that marked the end of the Celtic calendar year.

Halloween is correctly spelt as Hallowe’en.

Halloween is one of the oldest celebrations in the world, dating back over 2000 years to the time of the Celts who lived in Britain.

According to Irish legend, Jack O’Lanterns are named after a stingy man named Jack who, because he tricked the devil several times, was forbidden entrance into both heaven and hell. He was condemned to wander the Earth, waving his lantern to lead people away from their paths.

Halloween was originally a Celtic holiday celebrated on October 31.

Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes.

Obsolete Rituals focused on the Future and Love

But what about the Halloween traditions and beliefs that today’s trick-or-treaters have forgotten all about? Many of these obsolete rituals focused on the future instead of the past and the living instead of the dead. In particular, many had to do with helping young women identify their future husbands and reassuring them that they would someday—with luck, by next Halloween—be married.

  • In 18th-century Ireland, a matchmaking cook might bury a ring in her mashed potatoes on Halloween night, hoping to bring true love to the diner who found it.
  • In Scotland, fortune-tellers recommended that an eligible young woman name a hazelnut for each of her suitors and then toss the nuts into the fireplace. The nut that burned to ashes rather than popping or exploding, the story went, represented the girl’s future husband. (In some versions of this legend, confusingly, the opposite was true: The nut that burned away symbolized a love that would not last.)
  • Another tale had it that if a young woman ate a sugary concoction made out of walnuts, hazelnuts and nutmeg before bed on Halloween night she would dream about her future husband.
  • Young women tossed apple-peels over their shoulders, hoping that the peels would fall on the floor in the shape of their future husbands’ initials; tried to learn about their futures by peering at egg yolks floating in a bowl of water; and stood in front of mirrors in darkened rooms, holding candles and looking over their shoulders for their husbands’ faces.
  • Other rituals were more competitive. At some Halloween parties, the first guest to find a burr on a chestnut-hunt would be the first to marry; at others, the first successful apple-bobber would be the first down the aisle.
  • Bobbying for apples is a fertility rite, or a marriage divination and dates back to the Celtics. Unmarried people would try to bite into an apple floating in water or hanging from a string. The first person to bite into the apple would be the next one to marry.

bobbing for applesPumpkin Facts

  • Pumpkins are a member of the gourd family, which includes cucumbers, honeydew melons, cantaloupe, watermelons and zucchini. These plants are native to Central America and Mexico, but now grow on six continents.
  • The largest pumpkin pie ever baked was in 2005 and weighed 2,020 pounds.
  • Pumpkins have been grown in North America for five thousand years. They are indigenous to the western hemisphere.
  • In 1584, after French explorer Jacques Cartier explored the St. Lawrence region of North America, he reported finding “gros melons.” The name was translated into English as “pompions,” which has since evolved into the modern “pumpkin.”
  • Pumpkins are low in calories, fat, and sodium and high in fiber. They are good sources of Vitamin A, Vitamin B, potassium, protein, and iron.
  • The heaviest pumpkin weighed 1,810 lb 8 oz and was presented by Chris Stevens at the Stillwater Harvest Fest in Stillwater, Minnesota, in October 2010.
  • Pumpkin seeds should be planted between the last week of May and the middle of June. They take between 90 and 120 days to grow and are picked in October when they are bright orange in color. Their seeds can be saved to grow new pumpkins the next year.
  • The largest pumpkin ever measured was grown by Norm Craven, who broke the world record in 1993 with a 836 lb. pumpkin.
  • Stephen Clarke holds the record for the world’s fastest pumpkin carving time: 24.03 seconds, smashing his previous record of 54.72 seconds. The rules of the competition state that the pumpkin must weigh less than 24 pounds and be carved in a traditional way, which requires at least eyes, nose, ears, and a mouth.

Halloween Chocolate Chip Cookies

A classic goes wild!

Here’s a twist on the classic chocolate chip cookie that will leave you spellbound this Halloween.

Spider Cookies with Chocolate Chips

by Colleen Riley for Real Simple.com

Chocolate Chip Spider Cookies

Photo: Philip Friedman; Styling: Colleen Riley

Yield: 24 Cookies

Ingredients: 

  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room teperature
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup, plus 24, chocolate chips
  • 1 teaspoon canola oil

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 350°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment. Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl.
  2. Beat the butter and sugars in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium-high until light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Beat in the egg, then the vanilla, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. Reduce mixer speed to low and gradually add the flour mixture, mixing until just combined. Fold in ¾ cup of the chocolate chips.
  3. Drop mounds of the dough (about 1 ½ tablespoon each) 2 inches apart onto the baking sheets. Press one chocolate chip, pointed-side down, into the top of each cookie. Bake, rotating the sheets halfway though, until golden brown around the edges, 12 to 14 minutes. Let cool slightly on the baking sheets, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
  4. Place the remaining 1/4 cup chocolate chips and oil in a small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on high in 30-second intervals, stirring in between, until melted. Dip a toothpick in the melted chocolate and draw legs around the exposed chip.

 

Just a Note: To make the spiders even spookier, press red Nonpareils into the chocolate chip (you may need to use tweezers) when the cookies first come out of the oven.

 

I want my Mummy!

Pillsbury™ Offers a Fast Easy Way to Make Halloween Tasty

Mummy Chocolate Chip cookies

Photo by Pillsbury™

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 package Pillsbury™ Ready To Bake!™ refrigerated chocolate chip cookies
  • 1 container (1 lb) vanilla creamy ready-to-spread frosting
  • Neon orange and green food colors
  • Candy eyes

Directions: 

  1. Heat oven to 350°F. Bake cookies as directed on package. Cool completely.
  2. Separate frosting into 2 small bowls; add food colors to make desired neon orange and neon green colors.
  3. Spoon colored frostings into decorating bags fitted with flat basket weave tip #45. Squeeze bag to pipe frosting in crisscross pattern over cookies to look like mummy bandages. Attach candy eyes. Let stand until set, about 20 minutes.
  4. Be creative with any color you choose to decorate your mummies. If you don’t have food color on hand, use vanilla or chocolate frosting. Don’t have candy eyes? Use miniature candy-coated chocolate candies instead.

    how to make mummy cookies

    Wrap it Up! Use colored frosting to create the “mummy” look and add candy “eyes.”

Don’t have decorating tips or bags at home? Instead, spoon frosting into a resealable food-storage plastic bag, and cut about 1/4 inch off corner of bag to pipe mummy bandages onto the cookies.

 Chocolate Chip Werewolf Cookies

 Get creative with these cookies that will leave your guests howling for more.

Werewolf Chocolate Chip Cookies

Halloween party guests will go barking mad over these Werewolf Cookies.

Ingredients:

  • 1 package (16 oz) Pillsbury™ Ready to Bake!™ refrigerated chocolate chip cookies (24 cookies)
  • 1- 1/2 cups ready-to-spread chocolate frosting (from 16-oz. can)
  • Assorted small candies

Directions:

  1. Bake cookies as directed on package. Cool completely, about 10 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, spoon frosting into resealable plastic bag; seal bag. Cut tiny hole in bottom corner of food storage plastic bag.
  3. Pipe frosting onto cooled cookies to resemble hair. Attach candies with small amount of frosting to decorate face as desired.