Watermelon Martinis

Recipe by Better Homes & Gardens

Yield: 6 large Martinis

 

Ingredients:

  • 5 c. watermelon cubes (rind and seeds removed)
  • 3/4 c. lemon vodka
  • 6 Tbsp. lime juice
  • 3 Tbsp. Cointreau or triple sec
  • 3 Tbsp. sugar

 

Directions:

  1. Place watermelon in blender. Cover; blend until smooth. Pour puree into a pitcher and keep very cold, even a little frozen to make it icy.
  2. For 2 martinis, add one cup of watermelon puree, 1/4 cup of lemon vodka, 2 tablespoons of lime juice, one tablespoon each of Cointreau and sugar to the blender with 3 to 6 ice cubes. Cover; blend until slushy.
  3. Enjoy!

 

Nutrition Facts: Per serving: 150 kcal, 0 g fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g polyunsaturated fat, 0 g monounsaturated fat), 0 mg chol., 2 mg sodium, 20 g carb., 1 g fiber,14 g sugar,1 g pro.

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Watermelon Cooler

Recipe by Betty Crocker

Yield: 8 Servings

Watermelon Cooler

Photo by Betty Crocker

Ingredients: 

  • 8 c. 1/2-inch cubes watermelon
  • 1-1/2 c. ginger ale
  • 1/3 c. water
  • 1 can (6 oz.) frozen limeade concentrate, thawed

 

Directions:

  1. Place watermelon cubes in single layer in 1-gallon resealable freezer plastic bag; freeze 8 hours. Let stand at room temperature 15 minutes.
  2. In blender, place half each of watermelon, ginger ale, water and limeade concentrate. Cover; blend on medium speed until smooth. Pour mixture into pitcher. Repeat with remaining ingredients; stir into mixture in pitcher. Serve immediately.

 

Tips:

  • Look for seedless watermelon in the produce department to save having to remove the seeds when cutting the watermelon into cubes.
  • Garnish each cooler with a lime wedge and fresh mint leaves threaded on a fancy toothpick.

 

For Nutrition Information, click here.

Celebrate National Milk Day (Jan. 11) with Martha Stewart’s Bananas Foster Milkshake

Thank ol’ Bessie for that big glass of milk you have for breakfast!  It’s National Milk Day.

National Milk Day on January 11 commemorates the day that many think the first milk deliveries in glass bottles began in the United States.  Alexander Campbell of the New York Dairy Company professed to the New York State Senate that his company was the first to make these deliveries in 1878.

In 1915, The International Association of Milk Inspectors submitted a request to Congress in October of 1915 for a resolution naming an observance of National Milk Day. A date was not suggested in their request. No record that the incoming Congress ever presented a resolution for National Milk Day has been found, nor did incoming President Woodrow Wilson ever declare the day.

Regardless, it’s a day to celebrate milk and a good excuse to have a milkshake!

Martha Stewart's Bananas Foster Milkshake

Photo by Bryan Gardner

 

To celebrate, make a Bananas Foster Milkshake from Martha Stewart’s recipes.

This recipe is inspired from the sweet and salty dessert of the same name.

Ingredients:

 

Directions:

  1. Dip rim of a tall glass in caramel. Place glass in freezer while preparing milkshake.
  2. Blend vanilla ice cream and milk until thick but pourable. Add 1/2 of the banana and pulse to combine.
  3. Sprinkle remaining banana slices with sugar; using a hand-held kitchen torch, caramelize the bananas.
  4.  Spread some caramel sauce on the inside of the prepared glass. Add coffee ice cream. Drizzle with more caramel sauce and break 2 pretzels into glass. Top with milkshake; do not fill to the top of the glass or it will overflow when toppings are added. Pipe on whipped cream, as desired. Top with bruleed banana, more caramel sauce, and pretzels also dipped in caramel. Serve with a straw, a bowl and a spoon.

 

 

Milk Trivia

—  The United States and Australia are the world’s largest exporters of milk and milk products.

Life Photographer Nat Farbman's photo of cats Blackie and Brownie getting squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher's Dairy Farm.

Udder Bliss: Cats Blackie and Brownie (in foreground) catching squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher’s dairy farm. Photo by Nat Farbman

—  Throughout the world, there are more than 6 billion consumers of milk and milk products.

—  In the Middle Ages, milk was called the virtuous white liquor because alcoholic beverages were more reliable than water.

—  1863 – French chemist and biologist Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization, a method of killing harmful bacteria in beverages and food products.

—  1884 – American Doctor Hervey Thatcher of New York City, developed the first modern glass milk bottle, called ‘Thatcher’s Common Sense Milk Jar,’ which was sealed with a waxed paper disk. Later, in 1932, plastic-coated paper milk cartons were introduced commercially as a consequence of their invention by Victor W. Farris.

—  The females of all mammal species can by definition produce milk, but cow milk dominates commercial production. In 2011, FAO estimates  85% of all milk worldwide was produced from cows.   

—  Aside from cattle, many kinds of livestock provide milk used by humans for dairy products. These animals include buffalo, goat, sheep, camel, donkey, horse, reindeer and yak.

—  Milk is processed into a variety of dairy products such as cream, butter, yogurt, kefir, ice cream and cheese.

—   Modern industrial processes use milk to produce casein, whey protein, lactose, condensed milk, powdered milk and many other food-additive and industrial products.

—  World Milk Day is celebrated on June 1.

 

The Top 7 Dairy Cow Breeds are:

Holstein Cow

Holstein cows are the most popular of dairy breeds, since they tend to produce more milk than all the others. Holsteins are black and white (and sometimes red). Their markings are like human fingerprints: no Holsteins have the same markings. 

  1. Holsteins
  2. Jerseys
  3. Guernseys
  4. Ayrshires
  5. Brown Swiss
  6. Milking Shorthorns aka Durhams
  7. Dutch Belted

 

Pumpkin Pie Punch from Delish©

Love the Autumn season?  Enjoy the taste of pumpkin?  Well, this adult beverage is for you!

Recipe by Lena Abraham

Pumpkin Pie Punch

Knock their socks off with this tasty cocktail, Pumpkin Pie Punch, at your Halloween party!

 

Yield: 10-12 Servings

 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 gallon Apple Cider
  • 2 cups Ginger Ale
  • 1 can Pumpkin pie mix
  • 1 cup Vanilla Vodka
  • 2 cups whipped topping (i.e.: Cool Whip®)
  • Pumpkin Pie spice for garnish

 

Directions: 

  1. Combine cider, ginger ale, pumpkin pie mix and vodka in a pitcher. Stir until fully combined.
  2. Pour into glasses, top with Cool Whip®, sprinkle with pumpkin pie spice, and serve.

National Coffee Day – Sept. 29, 2017

NATIONAL COFFEE DAY

Whether getting one to go or lingering over a second cup, on September 29 be sure to observe National Coffee Day!

Ah, the perfect cup of java.  According to an expert cupper (a professional coffee taster), there are four components of a perfect cup: aroma, body, acidity, and flavor.

From the moment the average coffee lover opens a fresh bag of coffee beans, the aroma beckons, percolating the senses. Even those who don’t drink coffee tend to enjoy the fragrance a roasted bean casts.

 

When determining the body of a coffee, the bean, the roast, and the brew are all factors. The bean affects the texture of the coffee, whether its silky, creamy, thick or thin on the tongue and throat. However, the darker the roast and how it is brewed will alter the feel of a coffee’s body, too. Grandpa’s motor oil blend versus the coffee shop around the corner’s silky smooth, well-practiced grind have entirely different bodies.

The region a coffee is grown determines its acidity. The higher the elevation the coffee grows, the higher the quality and the acidity. These coffees are considered brighter, dryer, even sparkling by cuppers.

When it comes down to it, coffee lovers cherish the flavor as well as the caffeinated boost this roasted bean gives morning or night, black or with cream and sugar. Hot or cold it provides enjoyment even when decaffeinated!

 

There are many legendary accounts of how coffee first came to be, but the earliest credible evidence of either coffee drinking or the knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi monasteries around Mokha in Yemen.  It was here coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed, much like they are prepared today. Yemeni traders brought coffee back to their homeland from Ethiopia and began to cultivate the seed.

In 1670, coffee seeds were smuggled out of the Middle East by Baba Budan, as he strapped seven coffee seeds onto his chest.  The first plants grown from these smuggled seeds were planted in Mysore.  It was then that coffee spread to Italy, to the rest of Europe, to Indonesia and the Americas.

Brazil produces more coffee in the world than any other country followed by Colombia.  More than 50 countries around the world grow coffee, providing a delicious variety for the indulgence of steamy cups of the black drink for connoisseurs to consume.

 

.
HOW TO OBSERVE.

Enjoy a cup or two of your favorite coffee. Use #NationalCoffeeDay to post on social media.  Here is a list of National Coffee Day Specials.

Frappe Mocha Recipe

Yield: 2 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 tsp. instant coffee granules
  • 1/4 c. boiling water
  • 1 c. fat-free milk
  • 4-1/2 tsp. chocolate syrup
  • 1/2 c. crushed ice
  • Whipped topping and additional chocolate syrup (optional)

 

Directions:

  1. In a small bowl, dissolve coffee granules in water. Pour into an ice cube tray; freeze.
  2. In a blender, combine the milk, chocolate syrup and coffee ice cubes. Cover and process until smooth. Add crushed ice; blend. Pour into chilled glasses; serve immediately. Garnish with whipped topping and additional chocolate syrup if desired.

 

Nutritional Facts

1 cup: 80 calories, 0 fat (0 saturated fat), 2mg cholesterol, 61mg sodium, 15g carbohydrate (14g sugars, 0 fiber), 5g protein.

Originally published as Frappe Mocha in Cooking for One or Two Cookbook 2003, p37

4th of July Watermelon-Mint Coolers

Photo by Better Homes & Gardens©

Enjoy this refreshing beverage during your 4th of July picnic! (Photo by Better Homes & Gardens©)

Yield: 8 Servings

Ingredients

  • 3 1/4 lbs.seedless watermelon, chopped (5 cups)
  • 1/4 c. fresh mint leaves
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1/2 c. water
  • 1/2c .fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon aromatic bitters
  • 4-5c. ginger ale, chilled
  • Mint sprigs

 

 

Directions

  1. In a blender container place watermelon; puree until smooth. In a small heatproof bowl, use a wooden spoon to mash mint leaves and 1/4 cup of the sugar; add 1/4 cup of the water. Microwave on high until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer mint leaves to blender, leaving sugar in bowl. Blend until chopped.
  2. To bowl of sugar mixture add the remaining 1/4 cup sugar and 1/4 cup water. Microwave until sugar dissolves into a syrup, 1 to 2 minutes. Cover and chill.
  3. To serve, strain watermelon mixture into an ice-filled pitcher or jar. Stir in syrup, lime juice, and bitters. Divide watermelon mixture among ice-filled glasses; top with ginger ale. garnish with mint sprigs.

Nutrition Facts (Watermelon-Mint Coolers)

Per serving: 125 kcal cal.,0 g fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g polyunsaturated fat, 0 g monounsatured fat), 0 mg chol., 12 mg sodium, 32 g carb., 1 g fiber, 29 g sugar,1 g pro.Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet

 

From the Test Kitchen

ALCOHOLIC VERSION:

Add 2 cups white rum with the mint before chilling for 8 hours. Add club soda or sparkling water in place of ginger ale.

Nutrition analysis per serving: 212 calories, 1 g protein, 22 g carbohydrate, 0 g total fat (0 g sat. fat), 0 mg cholesterol, 1 g fiber, 19 g total sugar, 11% Vitamin A, 21% Vitamin C, 28 mg sodium, 2% calcium, 4% iron