Martha Stewart’s Turmeric and Lemon “Tea”

Here’s a little recipe from Martha Stewart that should soothe the throat and relax the nerves.  A cup of tea helps any situation, right?

Homemade Turmeric and Lemon Tea

Recipe photo courtesy of Aaron Dyer

Yield: 1 Quart

Ingredients:

  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • Peel (without pith) of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Pinch of cayenne

 

Directions: 

  1. Bring the ingredients to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. Remove from heat; steep, covered, until the liquid cools to room temperature.
  3. Strain and reheat to serve.

 

The brews can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.

 

 

Solar Power – Sun Tea Recipe

Use solar power to create a refreshing drink.  No need to turn on the kitchen stove to boil water when there is a beautiful sunny day.

 

Recipe by Elise Bauer of Simply Recipes

Sun tea

Photo by A. Jones

Ingredients:

  • 4 to 8 tea bags
  • 2 quart or 1 gallon glass container
  • Water

 

Instructions:

  1. Put 4 bags into a clean 2 quart glass container; place 8  bags into a clean gallon glass container.
  2. Fill with water and cap.
  3. Place container outside where sunlight can strike the container for approximately 3 to 5 hours.
  4. When tea has reached its desired strength, remove from the sun and place in the refrigerator…or pour yourself a glass over ice with a garnish of lemon.  (Feel free to remove tea bags prior to cooling.)

 

The Pioneer Woman has her own take on how to make sun tea.

Sommer Collier states:

Sun Tea 101

First of all, tea leaves release their flavor into liquid. Period.

It does not matter if the water is hot, cold, or somewhere in between. When the liquid is hot, we call it steeping. If the liquid is cold, it’s technically a plain old infusion. Either way, it really doesn’t matter what you call it. When tea leaves get wet, flavor comes out.

The reason most people steep tea in hot water (other than just liking hot beverages) is that the tea releases its flavor faster when the water is hot. A fast release in a short amount of time usually results in an intense flavor and deep color.

That’s not to say that the same thing can’t happen in cool or warm water over a longer period of time.”

She suggests the general time frame for sun tea is between 2 to 3 hours of sunshine.

 

According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, the hottest time of the day is around 3 pm.

“Heat continues building up after noon, when the sun is highest in the sky, as long as more heat is arriving at the earth than leaving. By 3 p.m. or so, the sun is low enough in the sky for outgoing heat to be greater than incoming. Sometimes the hottest time is earlier because a weather system moves in with cool air early in the day.”

 

Recipe for a Simple Syrup

Yield: 1-1/2 cup

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water

Instructions: 

  1. Combine sugar and water in a pan, stirring occasionally and bring to a boil.  Let cool then place in a container.
  2. Add desired amount to prepared iced tea. Enjoy!
  3. Place remaining syrup in the refrigerator.  It will last up to 4 weeks.

 

 

For another take on how to make Sun Tea and Cold Brew Iced Tea, check out Luzianne’s website.

 

Lipton’s Strawberry Iced Tea

Strawberry Iced Tea by Lipton

Strawberry Iced Tea by Lipton

Recipe by Lipton.com

Instructions:

  1. While your basic iced tea is still hot, pour in 1/6 – 1/3 cup superfine or powdered sugar and stir through.
  2. Add 1/8 – 1/4 cup lemon juice, balancing out the combination of lemon and sugar to taste.
  3. Puree a pint of fresh strawberries and sieve them to remove the strawberry seeds.
  4. Once the tea is cool, add the strawberry puree and place in the fridge for 30 minutes.

 

So don’t be afraid to get a little experimental with your pitchers. Once you’ve got your iced tea base, let the adventure begin!

 

 

Watermelon-Berry Lemonade

Recipe by Better Homes & Gardens™

Servings: 12

 

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups cubed seeded watermelon
  • 3 cups hulled and quartered strawberries
  • Two 12-ounce can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
  • 8 cups water
  • Wedges of fresh watermelon (optional)
  • Whole hulled strawberries (optional)

 

Directions:

  1. In blender, combine half of the watermelon, strawberries and lemonade concentrate. Cover; blend until smooth. Transfer to serving container. Repeat with remaining. Add water, chill up to 2 days.
  2. Serve over ice with watermelon wedges and strawberries. Makes 12 servings.

 

Tips:

Make up to 2 days ahead; cover and refrigerate. To serve, stir and add berries and watermelon wedges.

 

 

Nutritional Facts:

Per Serving: 145 calories, (0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 8 mg sodium, 37 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 1 g protein.

 

Christmas Sherbet Punch

Recipe by Ree Drummond, The Pioneer Woman for The Food Network

 

Yield: 20 Servings

Christmas Sherbet Punch

Photo by the Food Network

 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 gallon raspberry sherbet
  • 16 cups (1 gallon) cranberry juice (or cranberry mixed with pomegranate), well chilled
  • Two 2-liter bottles ginger ale, well chilled

 

Directions:

Make sure all the ingredients are very cold. Scoop the sherbet into a large punch bowl, then pour in the cranberry juice and ginger ale and stir gently.

 

Watermelon Martinis

Recipe by Better Homes & Gardens

Yield: 6 large Martinis

 

Ingredients:

  • 5 c. watermelon cubes (rind and seeds removed)
  • 3/4 c. lemon vodka
  • 6 Tbsp. lime juice
  • 3 Tbsp. Cointreau or triple sec
  • 3 Tbsp. sugar

 

Directions:

  1. Place watermelon in blender. Cover; blend until smooth. Pour puree into a pitcher and keep very cold, even a little frozen to make it icy.
  2. For 2 martinis, add one cup of watermelon puree, 1/4 cup of lemon vodka, 2 tablespoons of lime juice, one tablespoon each of Cointreau and sugar to the blender with 3 to 6 ice cubes. Cover; blend until slushy.
  3. Enjoy!

 

Nutrition Facts: Per serving: 150 kcal, 0 g fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g polyunsaturated fat, 0 g monounsaturated fat), 0 mg chol., 2 mg sodium, 20 g carb., 1 g fiber,14 g sugar,1 g pro.

Watermelon Cooler

Recipe by Betty Crocker

Yield: 8 Servings

Watermelon Cooler

Photo by Betty Crocker

Ingredients: 

  • 8 c. 1/2-inch cubes watermelon
  • 1-1/2 c. ginger ale
  • 1/3 c. water
  • 1 can (6 oz.) frozen limeade concentrate, thawed

 

Directions:

  1. Place watermelon cubes in single layer in 1-gallon resealable freezer plastic bag; freeze 8 hours. Let stand at room temperature 15 minutes.
  2. In blender, place half each of watermelon, ginger ale, water and limeade concentrate. Cover; blend on medium speed until smooth. Pour mixture into pitcher. Repeat with remaining ingredients; stir into mixture in pitcher. Serve immediately.

 

Tips:

  • Look for seedless watermelon in the produce department to save having to remove the seeds when cutting the watermelon into cubes.
  • Garnish each cooler with a lime wedge and fresh mint leaves threaded on a fancy toothpick.

 

For Nutrition Information, click here.

Celebrate National Milk Day (Jan. 11) with Martha Stewart’s Bananas Foster Milkshake

Thank ol’ Bessie for that big glass of milk you have for breakfast!  It’s National Milk Day.

National Milk Day on January 11 commemorates the day that many think the first milk deliveries in glass bottles began in the United States.  Alexander Campbell of the New York Dairy Company professed to the New York State Senate that his company was the first to make these deliveries in 1878.

In 1915, The International Association of Milk Inspectors submitted a request to Congress in October of 1915 for a resolution naming an observance of National Milk Day. A date was not suggested in their request. No record that the incoming Congress ever presented a resolution for National Milk Day has been found, nor did incoming President Woodrow Wilson ever declare the day.

Regardless, it’s a day to celebrate milk and a good excuse to have a milkshake!

Martha Stewart's Bananas Foster Milkshake

Photo by Bryan Gardner

 

To celebrate, make a Bananas Foster Milkshake from Martha Stewart’s recipes.

This recipe is inspired from the sweet and salty dessert of the same name.

Ingredients:

 

Directions:

  1. Dip rim of a tall glass in caramel. Place glass in freezer while preparing milkshake.
  2. Blend vanilla ice cream and milk until thick but pourable. Add 1/2 of the banana and pulse to combine.
  3. Sprinkle remaining banana slices with sugar; using a hand-held kitchen torch, caramelize the bananas.
  4.  Spread some caramel sauce on the inside of the prepared glass. Add coffee ice cream. Drizzle with more caramel sauce and break 2 pretzels into glass. Top with milkshake; do not fill to the top of the glass or it will overflow when toppings are added. Pipe on whipped cream, as desired. Top with bruleed banana, more caramel sauce, and pretzels also dipped in caramel. Serve with a straw, a bowl and a spoon.

 

 

Milk Trivia

—  The United States and Australia are the world’s largest exporters of milk and milk products.

Life Photographer Nat Farbman's photo of cats Blackie and Brownie getting squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher's Dairy Farm.

Udder Bliss: Cats Blackie and Brownie (in foreground) catching squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher’s dairy farm. Photo by Nat Farbman

—  Throughout the world, there are more than 6 billion consumers of milk and milk products.

—  In the Middle Ages, milk was called the virtuous white liquor because alcoholic beverages were more reliable than water.

—  1863 – French chemist and biologist Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization, a method of killing harmful bacteria in beverages and food products.

—  1884 – American Doctor Hervey Thatcher of New York City, developed the first modern glass milk bottle, called ‘Thatcher’s Common Sense Milk Jar,’ which was sealed with a waxed paper disk. Later, in 1932, plastic-coated paper milk cartons were introduced commercially as a consequence of their invention by Victor W. Farris.

—  The females of all mammal species can by definition produce milk, but cow milk dominates commercial production. In 2011, FAO estimates  85% of all milk worldwide was produced from cows.   

—  Aside from cattle, many kinds of livestock provide milk used by humans for dairy products. These animals include buffalo, goat, sheep, camel, donkey, horse, reindeer and yak.

—  Milk is processed into a variety of dairy products such as cream, butter, yogurt, kefir, ice cream and cheese.

—   Modern industrial processes use milk to produce casein, whey protein, lactose, condensed milk, powdered milk and many other food-additive and industrial products.

—  World Milk Day is celebrated on June 1.

 

The Top 7 Dairy Cow Breeds are:

Holstein Cow

Holstein cows are the most popular of dairy breeds, since they tend to produce more milk than all the others. Holsteins are black and white (and sometimes red). Their markings are like human fingerprints: no Holsteins have the same markings. 

  1. Holsteins
  2. Jerseys
  3. Guernseys
  4. Ayrshires
  5. Brown Swiss
  6. Milking Shorthorns aka Durhams
  7. Dutch Belted