Celebrate National Milk Day (Jan. 11) with Martha Stewart’s Bananas Foster Milkshake

Thank ol’ Bessie for that big glass of milk you have for breakfast!  It’s National Milk Day.

National Milk Day on January 11 commemorates the day that many think the first milk deliveries in glass bottles began in the United States.  Alexander Campbell of the New York Dairy Company professed to the New York State Senate that his company was the first to make these deliveries in 1878.

In 1915, The International Association of Milk Inspectors submitted a request to Congress in October of 1915 for a resolution naming an observance of National Milk Day. A date was not suggested in their request. No record that the incoming Congress ever presented a resolution for National Milk Day has been found, nor did incoming President Woodrow Wilson ever declare the day.

Regardless, it’s a day to celebrate milk and a good excuse to have a milkshake!

Martha Stewart's Bananas Foster Milkshake

Photo by Bryan Gardner


To celebrate, make a Bananas Foster Milkshake from Martha Stewart’s recipes.

This recipe is inspired from the sweet and salty dessert of the same name.




  1. Dip rim of a tall glass in caramel. Place glass in freezer while preparing milkshake.
  2. Blend vanilla ice cream and milk until thick but pourable. Add 1/2 of the banana and pulse to combine.
  3. Sprinkle remaining banana slices with sugar; using a hand-held kitchen torch, caramelize the bananas.
  4.  Spread some caramel sauce on the inside of the prepared glass. Add coffee ice cream. Drizzle with more caramel sauce and break 2 pretzels into glass. Top with milkshake; do not fill to the top of the glass or it will overflow when toppings are added. Pipe on whipped cream, as desired. Top with bruleed banana, more caramel sauce, and pretzels also dipped in caramel. Serve with a straw, a bowl and a spoon.



Milk Trivia

—  The United States and Australia are the world’s largest exporters of milk and milk products.

Life Photographer Nat Farbman's photo of cats Blackie and Brownie getting squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher's Dairy Farm.

Udder Bliss: Cats Blackie and Brownie (in foreground) catching squirts of milk during milking at Arch Badertscher’s dairy farm. Photo by Nat Farbman

—  Throughout the world, there are more than 6 billion consumers of milk and milk products.

—  In the Middle Ages, milk was called the virtuous white liquor because alcoholic beverages were more reliable than water.

—  1863 – French chemist and biologist Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization, a method of killing harmful bacteria in beverages and food products.

—  1884 – American Doctor Hervey Thatcher of New York City, developed the first modern glass milk bottle, called ‘Thatcher’s Common Sense Milk Jar,’ which was sealed with a waxed paper disk. Later, in 1932, plastic-coated paper milk cartons were introduced commercially as a consequence of their invention by Victor W. Farris.

—  The females of all mammal species can by definition produce milk, but cow milk dominates commercial production. In 2011, FAO estimates  85% of all milk worldwide was produced from cows.   

—  Aside from cattle, many kinds of livestock provide milk used by humans for dairy products. These animals include buffalo, goat, sheep, camel, donkey, horse, reindeer and yak.

—  Milk is processed into a variety of dairy products such as cream, butter, yogurt, kefir, ice cream and cheese.

—   Modern industrial processes use milk to produce casein, whey protein, lactose, condensed milk, powdered milk and many other food-additive and industrial products.

—  World Milk Day is celebrated on June 1.


The Top 7 Dairy Cow Breeds are:

Holstein Cow

Holstein cows are the most popular of dairy breeds, since they tend to produce more milk than all the others. Holsteins are black and white (and sometimes red). Their markings are like human fingerprints: no Holsteins have the same markings. 

  1. Holsteins
  2. Jerseys
  3. Guernseys
  4. Ayrshires
  5. Brown Swiss
  6. Milking Shorthorns aka Durhams
  7. Dutch Belted



Pumpkin Pie Punch from Delish©

Love the Autumn season?  Enjoy the taste of pumpkin?  Well, this adult beverage is for you!

Recipe by Lena Abraham

Pumpkin Pie Punch

Knock their socks off with this tasty cocktail, Pumpkin Pie Punch, at your Halloween party!


Yield: 10-12 Servings



  • 1/2 gallon Apple Cider
  • 2 cups Ginger Ale
  • 1 can Pumpkin pie mix
  • 1 cup Vanilla Vodka
  • 2 cups whipped topping (i.e.: Cool Whip®)
  • Pumpkin Pie spice for garnish



  1. Combine cider, ginger ale, pumpkin pie mix and vodka in a pitcher. Stir until fully combined.
  2. Pour into glasses, top with Cool Whip®, sprinkle with pumpkin pie spice, and serve.

4th of July Watermelon-Mint Coolers

Photo by Better Homes & Gardens©

Enjoy this refreshing beverage during your 4th of July picnic! (Photo by Better Homes & Gardens©)

Yield: 8 Servings


  • 3 1/4 lbs.seedless watermelon, chopped (5 cups)
  • 1/4 c. fresh mint leaves
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1/2 c. water
  • 1/2c .fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon aromatic bitters
  • 4-5c. ginger ale, chilled
  • Mint sprigs




  1. In a blender container place watermelon; puree until smooth. In a small heatproof bowl, use a wooden spoon to mash mint leaves and 1/4 cup of the sugar; add 1/4 cup of the water. Microwave on high until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer mint leaves to blender, leaving sugar in bowl. Blend until chopped.
  2. To bowl of sugar mixture add the remaining 1/4 cup sugar and 1/4 cup water. Microwave until sugar dissolves into a syrup, 1 to 2 minutes. Cover and chill.
  3. To serve, strain watermelon mixture into an ice-filled pitcher or jar. Stir in syrup, lime juice, and bitters. Divide watermelon mixture among ice-filled glasses; top with ginger ale. garnish with mint sprigs.

Nutrition Facts (Watermelon-Mint Coolers)

Per serving: 125 kcal cal.,0 g fat (0 g sat. fat, 0 g polyunsaturated fat, 0 g monounsatured fat), 0 mg chol., 12 mg sodium, 32 g carb., 1 g fiber, 29 g sugar,1 g pro.Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet


From the Test Kitchen


Add 2 cups white rum with the mint before chilling for 8 hours. Add club soda or sparkling water in place of ginger ale.

Nutrition analysis per serving: 212 calories, 1 g protein, 22 g carbohydrate, 0 g total fat (0 g sat. fat), 0 mg cholesterol, 1 g fiber, 19 g total sugar, 11% Vitamin A, 21% Vitamin C, 28 mg sodium, 2% calcium, 4% iron


Fresh-Squeezed Pink Lemonade Recipe

There’s a nice balance of sweet and tart in this refreshing summer drink. It becomes perfectly pink with the addition of grape juice. —Cindy Bartnicki, Mount Prospect, Illinois

Yield: 6 Servings


  • 4 cups water, divided
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 lemon peel strips
  • 1 cup lemon juice (about 5 lemons)
  • 1 tablespoon grape juice
  • Lemon slices and maraschino cherries, optional



  1. In a small saucepan, bring 2 cups water, sugar and lemon peel to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. Discard lemon peel.
  2. In a large pitcher, combine the remaining water, lemon juice, grape juice and sugar mixture. Serve over ice. Garnish with lemon slices and cherries if desired.



Nutritional Facts:
1 cup (calculated without optional ingredients) equals 141 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 1 mg sodium, 37 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, trace protein.
Originally published as Fresh-Squeezed Pink Lemonade in Reminisce August/September 2010, p47


Mimosa Recipe by Inspired Taste

Recipe by Joanne Gallagher of Inspired Taste

Yield: Make 8 Servings

Use a dry sparkling wine, not sweet. We usually will spend $12 to $15 on the sparkling wine we add to our mimosas. Your best bet is to look for “Cava,” which comes from Spain or an American sparkling wine that’s around $15. A dry Prosecco is a great option, too.


  • 1 (750 ml) bottle chilled dry sparkling wine
  • 3 cups (750 ml) chilled orange juice (freshly squeezed is best)
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) Grand Marnier or triple sec, optional


  • Fill 8 champagne flutes 1/2 full with chilled sparkling wine.
  • Top with orange juice.
  • (Optional) Top mimosa with 1 tablespoon of Grand Marnier or triple sec.

Joanne’s Tips:

  • To make 1 mimosa cocktail: In a champagne flute, combine 1/3 cup chilled sparkling wine, 1/3 cup chilled orange juice and 1 tablespoon Grand Marnier or triple sec.

Morning Orange Drink Recipe – National Orange Juice Day May 4, 2017

Yield: 4-6 servings


  • 1 can (6 ounces) frozen orange juice concentrate
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 10 ice cubes


  1. Combine the first five ingredients in a blender; process at high speed. Add ice cubes, a few at a time, blending until smooth. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Facts

3/4 cup: 115 calories, 1g fat (1g saturated fat), 6mg cholesterol, 21mg sodium, 24g carbohydrate (23g sugars, 0 fiber), 2g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 fruit, 1/2 reduced-fat milk.

Originally published as Morning Orange Drink in Country Woman March/April 1997, p33

Red, White & Blue Frozen Lemonade

This patriotic drink is as pretty as it is tasty. Layering cherries, blueberries and lemon juice, we created a striped lemonade that sings with Fourth of July pride. —Shawn Carleton, San Diego, California 

Yield: 4 Servings

Red, White & Blue Frozen Lemonade

Photo by Taste of Home©


  • 1 cup lemon juice
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 4 cups ice cubes
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • Maraschino cherries



Place lemon juice, sugar and ice in a blender; cover and process until slushy. Divide blueberries among four chilled glasses; muddle slightly. Add lemon slush; top with cherries.



Nutritional Facts
3/4 cup (calculated without cherries): 229 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0mg cholesterol, 1mg sodium, 60g carbohydrate (55g sugars, 1g fiber), trace protein
Originally published as Red, White and Blue Frozen Lemonade in Taste of Home June/July 2015