Red, White & Blue Frozen Lemonade

This patriotic drink is as pretty as it is tasty. Layering cherries, blueberries and lemon juice, we created a striped lemonade that sings with Fourth of July pride. —Shawn Carleton, San Diego, California 

Yield: 4 Servings

Red, White & Blue Frozen Lemonade

Photo by Taste of Home©

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup lemon juice
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 4 cups ice cubes
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • Maraschino cherries

 

Directions:

Place lemon juice, sugar and ice in a blender; cover and process until slushy. Divide blueberries among four chilled glasses; muddle slightly. Add lemon slush; top with cherries.

 

 

Nutritional Facts
3/4 cup (calculated without cherries): 229 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0mg cholesterol, 1mg sodium, 60g carbohydrate (55g sugars, 1g fiber), trace protein
Originally published as Red, White and Blue Frozen Lemonade in Taste of Home June/July 2015

 

Quick Watermelon Cooler

Yield: 4 Servings

Quick Watermelon Cooler

Photo by Taste of Home©

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups lemonade
  • 3 cups seedless watermelon, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup crushed ice

 

Directions:
In a blender, combine all ingredients; cover and process until smooth. Pour into chilled glasses; serve immediately.

 

Nutritional Facts
1 cup: 86 calories, 0g fat (0g saturated fat), 0mg cholesterol, 12mg sodium, 24g carbohydrate (22g sugars, 1g fiber), trace protein Diabetic Exchanges:1 starch, 1/2 fruit

 

Originally published as Watermelon Cooler in Simple & Delicious June/July 2010, p41

Raspberry Lemonade

Recipe courtesy of Ree Drummond

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups fresh lemon juice
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 bag frozen raspberries
  • Ice cubes, for serving

Directions:

  1. Squeeze the lemons and pour the juice into a pitcher. Mix together the sugar with 3 cups water and stir to dissolve to make a syrup. Add the syrup to the lemon juice and top it up with 8 cups water. Taste to make sure it’s sweet enough for you, and then add the raspberries.
  2. Mix the lemonade together and let chill in the fridge. (Keep in mind that the raspberries are tart, so be sure to sweeten enough!)
  3. Fill mason jars with ice cubes and top them off with the lemonade.

2012 Ree Drummond, All Rights Reserved

 

Floating 4-Leaf Clovers Recipe

Instead of using regular ice cubes in your party punch, stay in the spirit of St. Patrick’s Day and prepare these cute clover cubes. They’re made with soda so they won’t dilute your beverage. They can be made weeks in advance and stored in the freezer. —Taste of Home Test Kitchen

Four-Leaf Clovers

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: 12 clover cubes

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups plus 2 tablespoons chilled lemon-lime soda, divided
  • 12 lime slices
  • Lime peel (about 6 inches)

Directions:

  1. Pour 1/4 cup lemon-lime soda into 12 muffin cups; freeze until solid. On a work surface, cut lime slices into quarters. Rotate each quarter slice clockwise until one end of outer edge touches the center; place over frozen soda.
  2. To make a stem, cut the lime peel into 1/2-in. pieces. Place at one corner of clover. Freeze for 20 minutes.
  3. Slowly pour remaining soda into cups until lime is almost covered. Freeze until solid.

Originally published as Floating Four-Leaf Clovers in Taste of Home’s Holiday & Celebrations Cookbook Annual 2003, p187

Extra-Large Rosé Sbagliato

Yield: 10 plus servings

Extra-Large Rosé Sbagliato

Photo by J Muckle; Styling: Rebekah Peppler

  • 4 cups (32 oz.) Campari, chilled
  • 4 cups (32 oz.) sweet vermouth, chilled
  • 1 (750 ml) bottle sparkling rosé, chilled
  • Several large ice cubes or an ice ring, optional

Directions: 

  1. Combine the chilled Campari, vermouth, and rosé in a large pitcher or bowl. To serve, pour or ladle into champagne coupes or punch glasses.
  2. If the punch begins to warm, you may want to add large ice cubes or an ice ring to chill it. (The larger the cubes or the ring, the slower they will melt, and the less they will dilute the drink.)

 

By Rebekah Peppler

Lemonade Iced Tea

Lemonade Iced Tea

Photo by: Photo: Jennifer Davick; Styling: Buffy Harget

Similar to an Arnold Palmer, this refreshing drink combines two summer favorites—Southern Living – lemonade and iced tea. Turn this into a cocktail by adding bourbon or spiced dark rum.
Yield: Makes 8 cups

Ingredients: 

  • 3 cups water
  • 2 family-size tea bags
  • 1 (1-oz.) package fresh mint leaves (about 1 cup loosely packed)
    1/2 cup sugar
  • 4 cups cold water
  • 1 (6-oz.) can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
  • Garnish: fresh citrus slices

Directions: 

1. Bring 3 cups water to a boil in a 2-qt. saucepan. Remove from heat, add tea bags, and stir in fresh mint. Cover and steep 10 minutes.

2. Remove and discard tea bags and mint. Stir in sugar until dissolved.

3. Pour tea into a 3-qt. container, and stir in 4 cups cold water and lemonade concentrate. Serve over ice. Garnish, if desired.

Bourbon-Lemonade Iced Tea: Prepare recipe as directed, and stir in 1 cup bourbon. Makes 9 cups.

Spiced Dark Rum-Lemonade Iced Tea: Prepare recipe as directed and stir in 1 cup spiced dark rum.  Makes 9 cups.

 

Southern Living/JULY 2009 – Lemonade Iced Tea

Raspberry Lemonade Concentrate Recipe

Yield: 20 Servings

Raspberry Lemonade Concentrate

Photo by Taste of Home©

Ingredients:

  • 4 pounds fresh raspberries (about 14 cups)
  • 6 cups sugar
  • 4 cups lemon juice
  • Chilled tonic water or ginger ale
  • Ice cubes

Directions:

  1. Place raspberries in a food processor; cover and process until blended. Strain raspberries, reserving juice. Discard seeds. Place juice in a Dutch oven; stir in sugar and lemon juice. Heat over medium-high heat to 190°. Do not boil.
  2. Remove from heat; skim off foam. Carefully ladle hot mixture into five hot 1-pint jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Wipe rims; screw on bands until fingertip tight.
  3. Place jars into canner simmering water, ensuring that they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil; process for 10 minutes. Remove jars and cool.

To use concentrate: Mix 1 pint concentrate with 1 pint tonic water. Serve over ice. Yield: 5 pints (4 servings each)

Editor’s Note: The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.

Nutritional Facts:
1 cup lemonade equals 319 calories, trace fat (0 saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 20 mg sodium, 83 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 1 g protein.
Originally published as Raspberry Lemonade Concentrate in Taste of Home’s Holiday & Celebrations Cookbook Annual 2010, p209

Hot Chocolate Mix

Yield:  One batch makes Four 6-oz. servings of hot chocolate.

hot chocolate
Enjoy a cup of delicious-ness!

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz.  pkg. (Eight 1-ounce squares) semi-sweet baking chocolate
  • 1/2 c. unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/3 c. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper

Directions:  Finely chop the chocolate squares with a sharp knife.  Stir all the ingredients together in a bowl.

If giving as a gift, spoon the mixture into 2 sandwich-size zipper-closing bags and include directions on a card in each bag.

 

Hot Chocolate Mix Directions: 

To prepare 1 serving: Place 1/4 c. hot chocolate mix and 2/3 c. milk in a small saucepan.   Cook over medium heat, whisking frequently, until the chocolate is melted.

A Salute to the “King of the Cowboys” – the Roy Rogers Beverage

Roy Rogers, Dale Evans and Trigger

Queen of the West Dale Evans poses alongside her husband Roy Rogers and his horse Trigger.

Known as ‘King of the Cowboys,’ Roy Rogers is one of the most recognized cowboys in the world and often appeared with cowgirl Dale Evans. His majestic singing voice, charm and good guy persona was portrayed in all of his movies and TV shows including Tumbling TumbleweedsThe Cowboy and the Señorita and The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show.

Actor and singer Leonard Franklin Slye was born on November 5, 1911, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to parents Andrew and Mattie Slye. Known best as a singing cowboy, Rogers, with his trademark horse Trigger, appeared in nearly 100 films during the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s, many of them featuring his third wife, Dale Evans.  He died July 6, 1998.

Like child actress Shirley Temple, a non-alcoholic drink was named after American icon Roy Rogers.  The recipe is below.

The Roy Rogers

The Roy Rogers beverage

Photo Source: Allrecipes.com

This is also sometimes called a Cherry Cola despite the fact that most grenadine is made of pomegranate, not cherries. Whatever you call it, it is a nice mocktail.

Ingredients: 

Directions:  Pour the ingredients into a collins glass filled with ice. Stir well.  Garnish with the maraschino cherry.

(recipe provided by )

Witches’ Brew with Broomsticks

Yield: 8 Servings

Witches' Brew with Broomsticks
Photo by Taste of Home

Ingredients:

  • 8 orange candy slices
  • 8 cinnamon sticks (5 inches)
  • 8 pieces black shoestring licorice (10 inches)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup red-hot candies
  • 6 cups milk
  • 3/4 cup instant chocolate drink mix

 

Directions: 

  1. For broomsticks, on a lightly sugared surface, roll each orange slice into a 1/4-in.-thick triangle. With wet scissors, snip bottoms of triangles to resemble broom bristles. Wrap pointed end of each around a cinnamon stick. Coil a licorice piece around the top of each orange slice to secure to cinnamon stick; set aside.
  2. In a large saucepan, bring water and red-hots to a boil, stirring frequently until dissolved. Whisk in milk and chocolate drink mix. Cook, uncovered, over medium heat until hot. Pour into cups or mugs. Serve with broomstick stirrers.
Originally published as Witches’ Brew with Broomsticks in Taste of Home’s Holiday & Celebrations Cookbook Annual 2007, p244