Easy Challah Bread

Recipe by copetenn for All Recipes.com

Yield: 10 Servings

Easy Challah Bread

Photo by copetenn

Ingredients:

  • 1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast
  • 1 cup warm water (100 degreesF/40 degrees C)
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 3 beaten eggs
  • 3 1/2 c. all-purpose flour, plus more for kneading
  • 1 beaten egg yoke, or more if needed
  • 1 Tbsp. melted butter (optional)

Directions: 

  1. In a large bowl, stir the yeast into the water, and let the mixture stand until a creamy layer forms on top, about 10 minutes. Stir in honey and salt until dissolved, and add the beaten eggs. Mix in the flour, a cupful at a time, until the dough is sticky. Sprinkle the dough with flour, and knead until smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes.
  2. Form the dough into a compact round shape, and place in an oiled bowl. Turn the dough over several times in the bowl to oil the surface of the dough, cover the bowl with a damp cloth, and let rise in a warm area until doubled in size, 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  3. Punch down the dough, and cut it into 3 equal-sized pieces. Working on a floured surface, roll the small dough pieces into ropes about the thickness of your thumb and about 12 inches long. Ropes should be fatter in the middle and thinner at the ends. Pinch 3 ropes together at the top and braid them. Starting with the strand to the right, move it to the left over the middle strand (that strand becomes the new middle strand.) Take the strand farthest to the left, and move it over the new middle strand. Continue braiding, alternating sides each time, until the loaf is braided, and pinch the ends together and fold them underneath for a neat look.
  4. Place the braided loaf on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, and brush the top with beaten egg yolk. (For a softer crust, brush with melted butter instead.)
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  6. Bake the challah in the preheated oven until the top browns to a rich golden color and the loaf sounds hollow when you tap it with a spoon, 30 to 35 minutes. Cool on a wire rack before slicing.

Deviled Ham Eyeball Sandwiches

Recipe courtesy of Jeff Mauro

Yield: 20 “eyeball” sandwiches

Deviled Ham Eyeball Sandwich

Photo by The Food Network©

Ingredients:

  • 20 slices white bread, such as Arnold Brick Oven White Sandwich Bread
  • 2 cups smoked cooked ham, chopped (about 8 ounces)
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon pickled relish
  • 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 3 dashes hot sauce, such as Tabasco
  • Kosher salt
  • 10 pimento-stuffed green olives, sliced in half
  • Ketchup, for squirting
  • Special equipment: 2 1/2-inch round cookie cutter

 

Directions:

  1. Punch out rounds from the bread using a 2 1/2-inch round cookie cutter. Lay out the rounds on a baking sheet. Set aside.
  2. Add the ham, mayonnaise, honey, mustard, relish, Worcestershire and hot sauce in the bowl of a food processor. Sprinkle with salt and pulse until finely chopped, but still chunky.
  3. Spoon a tablespoon at a time of the ham mixture onto a parchment-lined baking sheet. Roll each spoonful into round balls. Stuff 1 olive into the center of each ball for eyes.
  4. Lay the balls in the center of the bread rounds. Squirt ketchup around the edges of the bread to mimic veins.
  5. Serve to kids and pray they don’t cry from how scary these are.

 

Popcorn Trail Mix

by Charlyn Fargo for Illinois Farm Bureau Partners

Popcorn Trail Mix

Photo by Jeffrey S. Otto, Food Styling by Mary Carter

Yield: 13 cups
Ingredients:

  • ½ cup popcorn kernels, un-popped
  • 7 cups multigrain cereal, such as Cheerios
  • 2 cups whole almonds, roasted and salted
  • 5 ounces dried cranberries, blueberries or cherries
  • ¼ cup butter
  • ¼ cup honey

 

Directions:

  1. Using an air popper, pop the popcorn. (It should make about 6 cups.) In a large bowl, mix cereal, almonds and popcorn.
  2. In a separate large bowl, mix butter and honey. Microwave on high for 1 to 2 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds, until mixture comes to a full boil and butter is melted. Pour over cereal mixture, stirring until evenly coated.
  3. Stir in cranberries, blueberries or cherries and mix well. Store in airtight container.

 

For more popcorn recipes,  click here on the Farm Flavor.com site. 

Grilled Romaine Panzanella

Yield: 8 Servings

Ingredients: 

  • 1 medium heart of romaine lettuce, cut in half lengthwise
  • 1/4 of a loaf ciabatta bread, cut in half horizontally
  • 1tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup grape and/or cherry tomatoes
  • 3 slices bacon
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup torn fresh basil

Directions:

  1. Brush cut sides of lettuce and bread with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Thread tomatoes onto skewers,* leaving 1/4 inch between each tomato. For a charcoal or gas grill, place lettuce and bread, cut sides down, and tomato skewers on the rack of a covered grill directly over medium heat. Grill for 2 to 4 minutes or until light grill marks appear on lettuce and tomatoes and bread is toasted, removing food from grill as it is done. Coarsely chop lettuce and cut bread into 1-inch pieces. Remove tomatoes from skewers.
  2. For vinaigrette, in a large skillet cook bacon over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon and drain on paper towels, reserving drippings in skillet. Cut up bacon; set aside. If necessary, add enough of the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the reserved drippings to equal 3 tablespoons. Add onion to the reserved drippings; cook until tender, stirring occasionally. Add vinegar, honey, salt, and pepper. Cook about 1 minute more or until reduced slightly, stirring to scrape up crusty browned bits.
  3. In a large bowl combine lettuce, bread, tomatoes, bacon, basil, and cheese. Drizzle with vinaigrette; toss gently to coat. Let stand for 15 minutes before serving.

From the Test Kitchen
TIP: This recipe can easily be doubled to serve 14 to 16 people.

*TIP: If using wooden skewers, soak in water for at least 30 minutes; drain before using.

Nutrition Facts: 
Per serving: 135 kcal cal., 9 g fat (3 g sat. fat, 1 g polyunsaturated fat, 4 g monounsatured fat), 13 mg chol., 245 mg sodium, 8 g carb., 1 g fiber, 1 g sugar, 4 g pro. Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Potluck Spare Ribs Recipe

Potluck Spareribs

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: 12 Servings

Ingredients: 

  • 6 pounds pork spareribs
  • 1-1/2 cups ketchup
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

 

Directions: 

  1. Cut ribs into serving-size pieces; place with the meaty side up on racks in two greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking pans. Cover tightly with foil. Bake at 350° for 1-1/4 hours or until meat is tender.
  2. Remove racks; drain and return ribs to pans. Combine the remaining ingredients; pour over ribs. Bake, uncovered, for 30-40 minutes or until sauce coats ribs, basting occasionally. Ribs can also be grilled over medium-hot heat for the last 30-40 minutes instead of baking.

 

Nutritional Facts
1 serving (1 each) equals 551 calories, 32 g fat (12 g saturated fat), 128 mg cholesterol, 1,065 mg sodium, 34 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 32 g protein.

 

Originally published as Potluck Spareribs in Taste of Home April/May 1996, p37

 

3-Ingredient Holiday Appetizers from BH&G.com

Better Homes & Garden™ offers ideas on appetizers for your holiday party.  For additional recipes and more information, click here at BHG.com.

 

Honey and Goat Cheese Crackers

Ingredients: Crackers + Goat Cheese + Honey
Store-bought rosemary crackers get a party-time facelift with the sweet and tangy topping of honey and goat cheese. Try different cracker flavors to spice up this easy appetizer.

Honey, Goat Cheese crackers
Photo Source: BHG.com

Pear and Blue Cheese Baguette Slices

Ingredients: Blue Cheese + Baguette Slices + Pear Slices

Top grilled baguette slices with sweet pear slices and tangy blue cheese.

PearBlueCheeseBaguette.
Photo Source: BHG.com

Hummus & Cucumber Chips

Ingredients: Potato Chips, Cucumber Slices and Hummus

Replace the bowl of chips and dip with this twist.  Place cucumber and hummus atop salt-and-pepper kettle potato chips to add creamy flavor and a cooler crunch.

Hummus Cucumber Chips
Photo Source: BHG.com

 

 

President’s Dogs

In honor of the American Humane Association’s Adopt-A-Dog Month, below are some famous dog owners and their pets.

James Buchanan, the only bachelor President, was accompanied at all times by Lara, his 170-pound Newfoundland, notable for a huge tail, an incredible attachment to his master, and the habit of lying motionless for hours with one eye open and one eye closed.

Lara, President Buchanan's dog

An illustrated picture of Lara, a male Newfoundland, was published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly. The dog became a big celebrity.

Abraham Lincoln‘s first dog was Honey, an injured brown and white hound dog he found in a Kentucky cave and nursed back to health.  Five years before being elected, Lincoln’s constant companion was Fido, a floppy-eared, yellow mutt.  His wife did not want Fido tracking mud onto White House carpets and jumping on formal furniture, so Lincoln sadly agreed to leave Fido with friends in Springfield, IL with strict instructions to indulge him.  At the President’s funeral, Fido met with the grieving public, who felt like they touched the President himself by petting his dog.

Theodore Roosevelt was an avid outdoorsman, and his home was filled with many dogs. Skip, a mixed breed adopted on a hunting trip, was his favorite. Skip’s short legs made it hard to keep up with his master on horseback, so the President would scoop him up to ride on the saddle.  Eventually, Skip would jump on the back of Algonquin, the pony belonging to Roosevelt’s 7-year-old son, Archie. It was quite a sight to see a small dog riding a small horse around the White House grounds all by himself!  Although Skip was buried behind the White House, Edith Roosevelt had his casket exhumed and moved to their estate at Sagamore Hill in Oyster Bay, Long Island, explaining, “Teddy couldn’t bear to leave him there beneath the eyes of Presidents who might care nothing for a little mutt dog.”

Richard Nixon used his daughter Tricia’s black-and-white cocker spaniel named Checkers to improve his public image When it looked like he might be dropped as Eisenhower’s Vice Presidential nominee due to questionable funds and gifts to aid his political career, he responded to these charges in an emotional speech and said the family would NOT return the gift of Checkers: “The kids love the dog, and regardless of what they say about it, we’re gonna keep it!”

Lyndon Johnson loved his dogs: the white collie, Blanco, the terrier, Yuki, and two beagles. Him and Her (who made the cover of Life magazine). President LBJ's beagles, Him and Her, on the cover of Life magazine Lady Bird nixed his plan to bring the dogs to daughter Luci’s White House wedding, but he managed to sneak them in for official family pictures. Pawprints adorned the Johnson Christmas cards right next to LBJ’s signature. However, he damaged his reputation while trying to get the beagles to do tricks for photographers.  LBJ picked up Him by his big, floppy ears and pictures of the yelping dog hanging by its ears appeared in every major newspaper before the day’s end.  Johnson was severely criticized by animal experts and the public, but this didn’t discourage him from letting TV cameras film him and Yuki “singing” in the Oval Office.

Eyebrow raising photo of LBJ picked up his beagle, Him, by the ears

U.S. President Lyndon Johnson received much criticism when reporters photographed him picking up his beagle, Him, by the ears.

Gerald Ford was actually locked out of the White House one night when he took Liberty, his golden retriever, out for a late walk on the south lawn and forgot to alert the Secret Service agents. Picture the President in his nightclothes, standing next to Liberty, pounding on the second-floor door inside the hallway, and having searchlights trained on him and agents pointing guns at him!

Click the following to find out more Presidential Dogs:  Dog Lover Store website

Rosh Hashana – September 24, 2014

Many Jewish Americans celebrate Rosh Hashana (or Rosh Hashanah), which is also known as the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashana starts on the first day of Tishrei (or Tishri), which is the seventh month in the Jewish calendar, and may last for two days. It is sometimes called the Day of Remembrance or the Day of Blowing the Shofar.

The Shofar is blown at some stage during Rosh Hashana.
The Shofar is blown at some stage during Rosh Hashana. (©iStockphoto.com/Tova Teitelbaum)

Many Jewish Americans observe Rosh Hashanah, known as the New Year in the Jewish calendar, for two days, while others celebrate the event for one day. It is a time of family gatherings, special meals and sweet foods. Many Jewish people celebrate Rosh Hashana by eating challah bread and apples dipped in honey.

Unlike the secular New Year in the Gregorian calendar (January 1), Rosh Hashana is a time of judgment and remembrance, on which God reviews and judges a person’s deeds in the past year. It is a time of prayer and penitence. All debts from the past year are supposed to be settled before Rosh Hashana. Many Jewish people seek forgiveness from friends and family prior to this event.

Some Jewish people perform the tashlikh. This is the custom of reciting prayers near naturally flowing water, such as a stream or river, and symbolically throwing one’s sins away in the form of small pieces of bread or other food. Many Jewish people perform tashlik from places such as the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges in New York. Some people may use a fish pond or mikveh (ritual bath) if there is no local river or stream.

People of Jewish faith may take the day off work or organize time off during this time of the year, to observe the belief that no work is permitted on Rosh Hashanah. Much of the day is spent in synagogue, where the regular daily liturgy is expanded. The story of Abraham is read in synagogues and the shofar (ram’s horn) serves as a reminder that God allowed Abraham to sacrifice a ram instead of Abraham’s son, Isaac. The shofar is blown like a trumpet in the synagogue during this time of the year.

Background
Rosh Hashana (or Rosh Hashanah) marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year and covers two of the 10 High Holy days that conclude with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. Some sources say that the early Jewish calendar had four New Years, corresponding the seasons, with Rosh Hashana being one of the New Years.

Festivals to mark the beginning of a new year in the fall have been held since the earliest days of the Israelites. These took the form of prayers of thanks for the grain harvest. The custom of blowing trumpets on the 10th day of the month of Tishrei is first described in the vision of Ezekiel, a prophet who lived sometime around 600–500 BCE. This custom has continued into modern times.

Symbols
The challah bread, which is eaten during Rosh Hashana, symbolizes the continuity of life. The apples that are dipped in honey symbolize sweetness and good health throughout the New Year. Some people also eat fish heads, which symbolize their desire to be on top, not the bottom, of life in the New Year. Pomegranates symbolize an abundance of goodness and happiness.

The shofar reminds people of Jewish faith that God allowed Abraham to sacrifice a ram instead of his Abraham’s son, Isaac. The tashlikh is an act that symbolizes throwing one’s sins in the water, so people believe that they are freed from their sins.
Note: Jewish holidays begin at sundown the day before the date specified for the holiday.