Veterans Day Word Search

Veterans Day Word Search

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One Daughter’s Wish to Honor her Father

Sonora Smart Dodd

Sonora Smart Dodd – The woman behind Father’s Day

In 1898, a young teen named Sonora Louise Smart lost her mother after childbirth to Sonora’s fifth sibling.  The chore of raising six children was left to husband and Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart on a rural farm in eastern Washington State.  He lived long enough to see Father’s Day as the beloved holiday that we celebrate today.

In 1909, following a Sunday morning sermon about Mother’s Day, she questioned why fathers were not honored.  She mad it her mission to establish a Father’s Day, wishing to celebrate it on her father’s birthday on June 5.   On June 19, 1910, Father’s Day was observed locally in Spokane, Washington.  Her efforts were, at times, met with jokes and mocking.  It wasn’t until a noted political leader William Jennings Bryan began to support her cause.

In 1916, United States President Woodrow Wilson approved the bill to establish an official Father’s Day.  In 1924, a formal proclamation issued by President Calvin Coolidge designated the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day and then in 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed it as a presidential proclamation.  It wasn’t until 1972, Father’s Day was created as a permeant national occasion by President Richard Nixon.

In 1978 at the age of 96, Sonora Louise Smart Dodd died seeing her dream become a reality — honoring her father, her husband and other men like them.

The History of Armed Forces Day courtesy of “History by Zim”

The blog “History by Zim: Beyond the Textbooks” offers an informational account of how this honor began.

 

On July 26, 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947 which consolidated the military branches under the Department of Defense’s control.  In late August 1949, …

Source: The History of Armed Forces Day

Veterans Day – Nov. 11, 2015

Poppy wreaths at a tombstoneRemembrance Day (also known as Poppy Day or Armistice Day) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth countries since the end of World War I to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. This day, or alternative dates, are also recognised as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries.

Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended “at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month,” in accordance with the Armistice, signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. (“At the 11th hour” refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) World War I officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.

The day was specifically dedicated by King George V on 7 November 1919 as a day of remembrance for members of the armed forces who were killed during World War I.

The Initial or Very First Armistice Day was held at Buckingham Palace commencing with King George V hosting a “Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic” during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace on the morning of 11 November 1919. This would set the trend for a day of Remembrance for decades to come.

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem “In Flanders Fields.” These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red colour an appropriate symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

World War I Colonel John McCrae, a surgeon with Canada's First Brigade Artillery, penned "In Flanders Fields."
World War I Colonel John McCrae, a surgeon with Canada’s First Brigade Artillery, penned “In Flanders Fields.”