National Barbecue Day – May 16, 2017

5 Fun Facts about BBQ from Foodimentary.com

LBJ and Hubery H. Humphrey, Victory Barbecue, 11/4/1964, by Hulton Archive, with permission of Getty Images.

President Lyndon Johnson and Humbert H. Humphrey celebrate the election results at the Victory Barbecue November 4 in 1964. Photo by Getty Images©

  • Grilling is no longer considered a male dominated activity. While 51 percent of males cha-cha with the charcoal, 49 percent of women flamenco with the flames.
  • 263,000 moist towelettes will wipe up BBQ sauce covering fingers and faces.
  • The most common ingredient added to barbecue sauce is garlic, followed by brown sugar.
  • The original barbecue sauce, dating back hundreds of years, consisted of vinegar and pepper.
  • Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th president of the United States, hosted the first barbecue at the White House that featured Texas-style barbecued ribs.

LYNDON JOHNSON’S FAVORITE BARBEQUE SAUCE

  • 1/4 c. butter or margarine
  • 1/4 c. cider vinegar
  • 1/4 c. ketchup
  • 1/4 c. lemon juice
  • 1/4 c. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 t. Tabasco sauce

 

Directions:

  1. Bring all ingredients to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. If baking chicken, pour over the chicken pieces in a foil lined pan.
  3. Bake, uncovered at 350° for 1 hour, basting occasionally. This is enough sauce to cover 6 large pieces of chicken. If baking more, this recipe can be doubled or tripled.
  4. Refrigerate leftover sauce.

 

Find Walter “The Barbecue King” Jetton’s recipe here.  He was instrumental in making LBJ’s barbecue events successful.

Houston’s Famous Barbecue Sauce

Sam Houston

Sam Houston

Samuel “Sam” Houston was not only the man known for putting Texas on the map but evidentially a connoisseur of barbecue sauce.

This recipe is from The Early American Cookbook by Dr. Kristie Lynn & Robert W. Pelton, published by McCauley Publications.

Ingredients
3 tblspoons cooking oil
¼ cup onion, grated
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 cup catsup
¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
¼ cup lemon juice
2 tblspoons white vinegar
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
¾ teaspoon salt
2 tblspoons sugar
2 teaspoons paprika
1 ½ teaspoons chili powder
1 tblspoon dry mustard
2 teaspoons water
Preparation
Heat the cooking oil in a large heavy cast iron skillet. Add the onion and the garlic. Sauté this lightly. Stir in the catsup, Worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, white vinegar, hot pepper sauce, sugar, paprika, chili powder and salt. Blend together thoroughly the dry mustard and the water until smooth. Then stir this into the sauce. Slowly bring this mixture to a boil. Cover and let simmer for 20 minutes. Makes 2 cups. Sam used this spicy concoction both as a marinade and a basting sauce for his barbecued steaks, chops and chicken.(This recipe is from The Early American Cookbook by Dr. Kristie Lynn & Robert W. Pelton, published by McCauley Publications. This book is available in the Sam Houston Memorial Museum gift shop.)
Sam Houston's BBQ sauce

Get more details on the Homesick Texan’s website.            Photo by Lisa Fain.

 

 

 

 

 

Potluck Spare Ribs Recipe

Potluck Spareribs

Photo by Taste of Home©

Yield: 12 Servings

Ingredients: 

  • 6 pounds pork spareribs
  • 1-1/2 cups ketchup
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

 

Directions: 

  1. Cut ribs into serving-size pieces; place with the meaty side up on racks in two greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking pans. Cover tightly with foil. Bake at 350° for 1-1/4 hours or until meat is tender.
  2. Remove racks; drain and return ribs to pans. Combine the remaining ingredients; pour over ribs. Bake, uncovered, for 30-40 minutes or until sauce coats ribs, basting occasionally. Ribs can also be grilled over medium-hot heat for the last 30-40 minutes instead of baking.

 

Nutritional Facts
1 serving (1 each) equals 551 calories, 32 g fat (12 g saturated fat), 128 mg cholesterol, 1,065 mg sodium, 34 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 32 g protein.

 

Originally published as Potluck Spareribs in Taste of Home April/May 1996, p37