Solar Power – Sun Tea Recipe

Use solar power to create a refreshing drink.  No need to turn on the kitchen stove to boil water when there is a beautiful sunny day.

 

Recipe by Elise Bauer of Simply Recipes

Sun tea

Photo by A. Jones

Ingredients:

  • 4 to 8 tea bags
  • 2 quart or 1 gallon glass container
  • Water

 

Instructions:

  1. Put 4 bags into a clean 2 quart glass container; place 8  bags into a clean gallon glass container.
  2. Fill with water and cap.
  3. Place container outside where sunlight can strike the container for approximately 3 to 5 hours.
  4. When tea has reached its desired strength, remove from the sun and place in the refrigerator…or pour yourself a glass over ice with a garnish of lemon.  (Feel free to remove tea bags prior to cooling.)

 

The Pioneer Woman has her own take on how to make sun tea.

Sommer Collier states:

Sun Tea 101

First of all, tea leaves release their flavor into liquid. Period.

It does not matter if the water is hot, cold, or somewhere in between. When the liquid is hot, we call it steeping. If the liquid is cold, it’s technically a plain old infusion. Either way, it really doesn’t matter what you call it. When tea leaves get wet, flavor comes out.

The reason most people steep tea in hot water (other than just liking hot beverages) is that the tea releases its flavor faster when the water is hot. A fast release in a short amount of time usually results in an intense flavor and deep color.

That’s not to say that the same thing can’t happen in cool or warm water over a longer period of time.”

She suggests the general time frame for sun tea is between 2 to 3 hours of sunshine.

 

According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, the hottest time of the day is around 3 pm.

“Heat continues building up after noon, when the sun is highest in the sky, as long as more heat is arriving at the earth than leaving. By 3 p.m. or so, the sun is low enough in the sky for outgoing heat to be greater than incoming. Sometimes the hottest time is earlier because a weather system moves in with cool air early in the day.”

 

Recipe for a Simple Syrup

Yield: 1-1/2 cup

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water

Instructions: 

  1. Combine sugar and water in a pan, stirring occasionally and bring to a boil.  Let cool then place in a container.
  2. Add desired amount to prepared iced tea. Enjoy!
  3. Place remaining syrup in the refrigerator.  It will last up to 4 weeks.

 

 

For another take on how to make Sun Tea and Cold Brew Iced Tea, check out Luzianne’s website.

 

Lipton’s Strawberry Iced Tea

Strawberry Iced Tea by Lipton

Strawberry Iced Tea by Lipton

Recipe by Lipton.com

Instructions:

  1. While your basic iced tea is still hot, pour in 1/6 – 1/3 cup superfine or powdered sugar and stir through.
  2. Add 1/8 – 1/4 cup lemon juice, balancing out the combination of lemon and sugar to taste.
  3. Puree a pint of fresh strawberries and sieve them to remove the strawberry seeds.
  4. Once the tea is cool, add the strawberry puree and place in the fridge for 30 minutes.

 

So don’t be afraid to get a little experimental with your pitchers. Once you’ve got your iced tea base, let the adventure begin!

 

 

Watermelon-Berry Lemonade

Recipe by Better Homes & Gardens™

Servings: 12

 

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups cubed seeded watermelon
  • 3 cups hulled and quartered strawberries
  • Two 12-ounce can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
  • 8 cups water
  • Wedges of fresh watermelon (optional)
  • Whole hulled strawberries (optional)

 

Directions:

  1. In blender, combine half of the watermelon, strawberries and lemonade concentrate. Cover; blend until smooth. Transfer to serving container. Repeat with remaining. Add water, chill up to 2 days.
  2. Serve over ice with watermelon wedges and strawberries. Makes 12 servings.

 

Tips:

Make up to 2 days ahead; cover and refrigerate. To serve, stir and add berries and watermelon wedges.

 

 

Nutritional Facts:

Per Serving: 145 calories, (0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 8 mg sodium, 37 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 1 g protein.

 

Iced Tea Day – June 10, 2014

Iced Tea Day is celebrated on June 10.

Historians believe that people began serving cold tea sometime during the 19th century. The drink became popular when vendors started selling it at public events.

Popularized at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, iced tea has become a summertime staple in the United States.

Iced tea or ice tea is a form of cold tea, usually served in a glass with ice. It may or may not be sweetened. Iced tea is also a popular packaged drink.

It can be mixed with flavored syrup, with common flavors including lemon, peach, raspberry, lime, passion fruit, strawberry and cherry. While most iced teas get their flavor from tea leaves, tisanes are also sometimes served cold and referred to as iced tea.

In the United States, iced tea makes up about 85% of all tea consumed and is very popular as an alternative to carbonated soft drinks, especially in the hotter southern states: it is ubiquitous in restaurants, convenience stores, vending machines, and grocery stores. It may be freshly made on premises, or available in bottles and cans, and at self-serve soda fountains. Restaurants typically give the customer the choice of sweetened or unsweetened.

Iced tea’s popularity in the United States has led to an addition to standard cutlery sets: the iced tea spoon is a teaspoon with a long handle, suitable for stirring sugar into glasses.

In the summer, iced tea is at its most popular. It is a common stereotype of the Southeastern United States due to the popularity of sweet iced tea in that region that unsweetened iced tea is not available and/or frowned upon. It is true that often the term “iced tea” is assumed to mean sweetened iced tea by default in that region. (With material from: Wikipedia)

Today, people make iced tea using a variety of different flavors. You can also mix iced tea with other beverages. One of the most popular iced tea beverages is an “Arnold Palmer,” which consists of half iced tea and half lemonade.

Sweetened or unsweetened, flavored or unflavored, celebrate Iced Tea Day with a nice, tall glass of your favorite iced tea!

 

The Best Way to Make Iced Tea

From the test labs of SomethingEdible.com
iced tea

Photo by the Something Edible blog. (2011)©

Servings: Makes a half-gallon (around 2 Liters)
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Ingredients:
Special Equipment

  • French press The big 1 Liter model.
  • half-gallon pitcher Must be stainless-steel or durable plastic.
  • instant-read thermometer For testing water temperature.

The Consumables:

  • 3 Tbsps loose black tea heaping (.75oz by weight for the persnickety.)
  • 32 fluid oz very hot water (Between 180F-200F)
  • 32 fluid oz very cold water (That’s still a quart, people)

Instructions:
Using a microwave, electric kettle or whatever, heat your water to the desired temperature. Add loose tea to the French press, pour hot water over the leaves, replace the lid of the press (taking care not to yet mash the plunger) and allow to steep for 5 minutes. Press the steeped tea according to your press manufacturer’s directions and pour the hot tea into your thermally-resilient pitcher; then add the remaining cold water.

To serve, pour over ice and garnish and/or flavor as you see fit.