4th of July – Trivia Quiz

Take the Quiz today.  Check back later for the answers.

Washington D.C.
The mall and the Washington monument in Washington D.C.

1. Who designed the National Mall in Washington, D.C.?

A. Pierre L’Enfant
B. George Washington
C. Thomas Jefferson
D. John Adams

 

2. Who was the first signer of the Declaration of Independence, and why is his signature so large?

A. George Washington
B. Patrick Henry
C. John Hancock
D. Thomas Jefferson
E. John Adams

 

3. What famous character with a stars-and-stripes top hat has become a symbol of America?

A. Cat in The Hat
B. Uncle Sam
C. Captain America
D. Big Bird

 

The US Flag and the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii.

The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii.

4. On July 4th of what year did the 50-star American flag wave for the first time as Hawaii was granted statehood?

A. 1955
B. 1960
C. 1965
D. 1970

 

5. Which of our Founding Fathers created the blueprint for our Fourth of July celebrations by suggesting that the day be celebrated with “bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other” by succeeding generations of Americans?

A. George Washington
B. John Adams
C. Thomas Jefferson
D. John Hancock
E. Benjamin Franklin

 

6. What notable event occurred on July 4, 1848?

A. Boston’s first fireworks display
B. The State of New York emancipates its slaves
C. Construction begins on the Washington Monument
D. Centennial celebrations are held in the United States
E. The first public Fourth of July reception at the White House

 

7. About how many people were living in the colonies in July 1776?

A. 1.5 million
B. 22 million
C. 2 million
D. 2.5 million
E. 12 million

 

8. Only one president, Calvin Coolidge, was born on the Fourth of July. Three presidents died on that date. Who were they?

Baby in Patriotic cap - Photo by Erika Iurcovich Photography
Click here for this baby cap. Erika Iurcovich Photography

A. George Washington,Chester Arthur and James Monroe
B. Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson and Richard M. Nixon
C. Zachary Taylor, Ulysses Grant and Warren Harding
D. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe
E. Harry Truman, Franklin Pierce and John Tyler

 

9. What American president said, “We dare not forget that we are the heirs of that first revolution?”

A. George Washington
B. John F. Kennedy
C. Abraham Lincoln
D. Dwight Eisenhower
E. Franklin Roosevelt

 

10. On July 4, 1976, Americans all over the country celebrated our nation’s 200th birthday. How many tons of fireworks were exploded in a magnificent display above the Washington Monument in Washington, DC?

A. 5
B. 24
C. 33

 

11. Which of John Philip Sousa’s compositions was designated the National March of the United States in 1987?

A. “The Liberty Bell”
B. “US Field Artillery”
C. “The Stars and Stripes Forever”
D. “The Washington Post March”

 

12. When Francis Scott Key wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner” in 1814, it immediately became popular with the public. When was it adopted as our national anthem?

A. 1798
B. 1812
C. 1954
D. 1865
E. 1931

 

 

Washington Monument in Washington D.C., USA

The Washington Monument is an obelisk-shaped building in Washington, D.C.that was built to honor the first President of the United States of America George Washington. This 555-foot-tall obelisk is the tallest building in the District of Columbia.  By law, no other building in D.C. is allowed to be taller.

Washington Monument in D.C., USA

The Washington Monument honors the first American President.

Pierre Charles L’Enfant (the architect who designed Washington, D.C.) planned in 1783 to have a prominent statue honoring George Washington near the White House and Capitol. But exactly how to honor the first President of the United States was not an easy decision.  In 1833 the Washington National Monument Society was formed with the purpose of deciding upon an appropriate memorial. This group had a design competition with architect Robert Mills‘ design winning the contest in 1836.

Work on the stone monument to George Washington did not begin until July 4, 1848 due to lack of funds. Work on the monument was stopped in 1854 when the monument was only 152 feet tall, once again.  This time it was because donations dropped off.  The project was almost abandoned but work finally started again in 1876.

Sharp-eyed tourists can see the slight difference in color of the marble on the bottom third and the upper two-thirds of the monument.

The Army Corps of Engineers, who started working on the monument after the Civil War, determined that the foundation was not sufficient for the 600-foot-tall obelisk that was originally planned, so a 550-foot-monument was built.

The exterior of the Washington Monument was completed on Dec. 6, 1884. After the interior was completed, the monument was opened to the public.  Inside the Washington Monument is an elevator and a 897-step stairway. There is an observation deck at 500 feet.

The giant obelisk contains 36,491 blocks and weighs 90,854 tons. Lightning rods at the top protect the monument from lightning strikes.

At the time the monument was built, aluminum was newly discovered, scarce and very expensive. Therefore there is a nine-inch-tall aluminum pyramid at the top of the Washington monument.

 

Facts and Figures about the Washington Monument:

Height from ground to top 555 feet 5 1/8 inches = 169.29 meters
Width at base of monument 55 feet 1 1/2 inches = 16.80 meters
Thickness of monument walls at base 15 feet = 4.57 meters
Number of blocks in monument 36,491
Cornerstone laid July 4, 1848
Capstone set December 6, 1884
Officially opened to the public October 9, 1888
Cost of monument $1,187,710
Designed by Robert Mills
 
Information provided by Enchanted Learning.com