Honoring Memorial Day – May 30, 2016

Eagle mourns for veterans

All gave some.. Some gave all. Remember them this Memorial Day.

Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering the people who died while serving in the country’s armed forces. The holiday, which is observed every year on the last Monday of May, was formerly known as Decoration Day and originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the war. By the 20th century, Memorial Day had been extended to honor all Americans who died while in the military service. It typically marks the start of the summer vacation season, while Labor Day marks its end.

Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service. Many volunteers place an American flag on each grave in national cemeteries.

Annual Decoration Days for particular cemeteries are held on a Sunday in late spring or early summer in some rural areas of the American South, notably in the mountain areas. In cases involving a family graveyard where remote ancestors as well as those who were deceased more recently are buried, this may take on the character of an extended family reunion to which some people travel hundreds of miles. People gather on the designated day and put flowers on graves and renew contacts with relatives and others. There often is a religious service and a picnic-like “dinner on the ground,” the traditional term for a potluck meal in which people used to spread the dishes out on sheets or tablecloths on the grass. It is believed that this practice began before the American Civil War and thus may reflect the real origin of the “memorial day” idea.

Memorial Day is not to be confused with Veterans Day; Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving, while Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans.

Young child in uniform at military cemetery

Photo by rao nageswar

Oven-Roasted Spring Vegetable Medley Recipe

Yield: 10 Servings

Oven-Roasted Spring Vegetable Medley Recipe photo by Taste of Home

Oven-Roasted Spring Vegetable Medley Recipe photo by Taste of Home

Ingredients:

  • 9 small red potatoes, quartered
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 small yellow summer squash, quartered and cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 2 small zucchini, quartered and cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 6 radishes, quartered
  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425°. In a large bowl, toss potatoes with oil, salt and pepper. Transfer to a shallow roasting pan. Bake 15 minutes.
  2. In same bowl, combine remaining ingredients; add to pan. Bake 20-25 minutes longer or until vegetables are tender.

 

Nutritional Facts
3/4 cup equals 90 calories, 3 g fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 131 mg sodium, 15 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 2 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 starch, 1/2 fat.

 

Originally published as Oven-Roasted Spring Vegetable Medley in Taste of Home’s Holiday & Celebrations Cookbook Annual 2011, p167

Word Scramble

Directions: Unscramble these words related to Spring and gardening.

  1. GNRISP
  2. DCRAANIL
  3. LWOERT
  4. TOPTNIG LISO
  5. OFLRWETOP
  6. SESDE
  7. LIPSUT
  8. ZEFILRTIRE
  9. TAEWR
  10. RSPIRNLEK
  11. DILWLOFWRE
  12. SEWDE
  13. NDILDEONA
  14. AIDYS

First Day of Spring

Answers:

  1. Spring
  2. Cardinal
  3. Trowel
  4. Potting Soil
  5. Flowerpot
  6. Seeds
  7. Tulips
  8. Fertilizer
  9. Water
  10. Sprinkler
  11. Wildflower
  12. Weeds
  13. Dandelion
  14. Daisy

This puzzle was by Creative Forecasting Inc. 

Spring has Sprung! The Vernal Equinox

By Cameron Macphail and Rozina Sabur for The Telegraph

When does spring start in 2016?
The astronomical spring in the Northern Hemisphere begins today, Sunday, March 20.
The Spring (vernal) equinox in the Northern Hemisphere is also known as the March equinox. It’s called the “autumnal (fall) equinox” in the Southern Hemisphere.

The March equinox marks the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator – the imaginary line in the sky above the Earth’s equator – from south to north.
This happens on March 19, 20 or 21 every year.

Why is it Called “Equinox”?
Since night and day are nearly exactly the same length – 12 hours – all over the world the event is called the equinox, which in Latin, literally means ‘equal night’ (equi – equal and nox – night).
In reality though, equinoxes do not have exactly 12 hours of daylight.
Solstices and equinoxes mark key stages in the astronomical cycle of the earth. In a year there are two equinoxes (spring and autumn) and two solstices (summer and winter).
The dates of the equinoxes and solstices aren’t fixed due to the Earth’s elliptical orbit of the sun. The Earth’s orbit around the sun means that in early January, the sun is closest (known as perihelion) and in early July it is most distant (aphelion).
What happens on an equinox?
The Earth’s axis always tilts at an angle of about 23.5° in relation to the ecliptic, i.e the imaginary plane created by the Earth’s orbit around the Sun.
On any other day of the year, either the Northern Hemisphere or the Southern Hemisphere tilts a litte towards the Sun but on the two equinoxes, the tilt of the Earth’s axis is perpendicular to the Sun’s rays.
The equinox happens at exactly the same time around the world.
The equinox occurs at the exact moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator – the imaginary line in the sky above the Earth’s Equator – from south to north. At this moment, the Earth’s axis is neither tilted away from nor towards the Sun.
In 2016, this happens at 4:30 am UTC (GMT).

The March equinox has long been celebrated as a time of rebirth in the Northern Hemisphere. Many cultures celebrate spring festivals and holidays around the March equinox, like Easter and Passover.

The Easter Bunny
Rabbits and hares have been associated with spring since ancient times. It is thought that the Ango-Saxon Goddess of Spring, Eostre, had a hare as her companion, which symbolised fertility and rebirth.
It’s hardly surprising that rabbits and hares have become associated with fertility as they are both prolific breeders and give birth to large litters in early spring.

Anglo-Saxon Goddess of Spring, Eostre

Anglo-Saxon Goddess of Spring, Eostre

The legend of the Easter Bunny is thought to have originated among German Lutherans, where the ‘Easter Hare’ judged whether children had been good or bad in the run-up to Easter.
Over time it has become incorporated into Christian celebrations and became popular in Britain during the 19th century.
Many children believe that the Easter Bunny lays and hides baskets of colored eggs, sweets and sometimes toys in their homes or around the garden the night before Easter Sunday – much like Father Christmas delivering gifts on Christmas Eve.
This has given rise to the tradition of the Easter egg hunt which is still popular among children today.